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2008 Domaine Dujac Clos de la Roche

Removed from a professional wine storage facility

2 available
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Light label condition issue

Removed from a professional wine storage facility

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RATINGS

95The Wine Advocate

The wine literally floats on the palate with weightless elegance in its intensely perfumed fruit. Crushed flowers and red berries linger on the silky, impossibly fine finish. This is a fabulous effort from Dujac.

94Stephen Tanzer

Knockout nose combines dark raspberry, licorice and a peppery complexity. Fatter, sweeter and richer than the Clos Saint-Denis, with a positive peppery/herbal component from the vinification with the stems contributing to the wine's...

93Burghound.com

Airy and cool red berry fruit cut with hints of stone, game and leather leads to detailed, robust and firmly muscular broad-shouldered flavors that are presently very backward, serious and superbly long...

18Jancis Robinson

...Round and luscious though with a fine backbone and no shortage of fine tannins at the moment. Very fine with a solidity underneath. Red-fruits spectrum. Finishes quite dry

REGION

France, Burgundy, Côte d'Or, Côte de Nuits, Morey-St.-Denis, Clos de la Roche

Clos de la Roche is a 41-acre Grand Cru vineyard in the Morey St.-Denis appellation in the Cotes de Nuits, in northern Burgundy. The tiny village of Morey St.-Denis is just south of Gevrey-Chambertin and Clos de Roche is considered the appellation’s most superior Grand Cru. The vineyard’s elevation ranges from 270 to 300 meters, and its soil is extremely rocky with excellent drainage. The soil is largely limestone, and in some places it is barely a foot deep. Writer Clive Coates calls Clos de Roche “the classiest of the Morey Grand Crus.” The largest landholders are Ponsot with 8.35 acres; Dujac, 4.88 acres; and Armand Rousseau, 3.7 acres.

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir, Grand Cru

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.