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1999 Maison Leroy Bourgogne Rouge

Light label condition issue

Removed from a professional wine storage facility; Purchased upon release; Consignor is original owner

4 available
Bid *

Light label condition issue

Removed from protected passive storage in a temperature controlled home; Purchased upon release; Consignor is original owner

2 available
Bid *
Ends Sunday, 7pm Pacific

PRODUCER

Maison Leroy

Maison Leroy is often called the greatest estate in Burgundy. Its wines are legendary, as is its history. Founded in 1868 by Francois Leroy in Vosne-Romanee, the Leroy name was associated with outstanding wine by the late 19th century. In 1942 the family purchased half of Domaine de la Romanee-Conti. Today the estate is run by the remarkable Lalou Leroy, who ran the family’s negociant business for decades before taking over winemaking in 1988. She added vineyards to the estate and today has 56 acres of prime parcels planted to Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Aligote. About 17 of her acres are in grand cru vineyards, including Corton-Charlemagne, Corton-Renardes, Richebourg, Romanee-St. Vivant, Clos de Vougeot, Musigny, Clos de la Roche, Latricieres-Chambertin and Chambertin. Robert M. Parker Jr. has called Leroy’s wines “the reference point for Burgundy…(the wines) are among the noblest and purest expressions of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay in Burgundy.”

REGION

France, Burgundy, Côte d'Or

The Côte d’Or literally means the “slope of gold” and to Burgundy collectors it is sacred ground. It is home to most fabled Pinot Noir and Chardonnay vineyards in the world, as well as historic domaines that trace their traditions back hundreds of years. The 30-mile long ridge stretches from just south of Dijon on the north to a little past Santenay in the south. At its widest, the Côte d’Or is a mere 1.5 miles across and sometimes it is merely a few hundred yards across. During several geological periods shifting sea beds left calcium-rich shellfish deposits on the ridge, creating unique, rocky soils that have become excellent vineyards. The Côte d’Or is further divided into a north and south. The Côte de Nuits is more or less the northern half, and is most famous for its Pinot Noir, while the Côte d’Beaune is the southern half, and is especially noted for its Chardonnay.

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir, AOC (AC)

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.