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2018 Cayuse Armada Vineyard God Only Knows

Removed from a professional wine storage facility; Purchased upon release; Consignor is original owner

Ends Sunday, 7pm Pacific

RATINGS

98Jeb Dunnuck

Gorgeous rose petals, wildflowers, cured meats, wild strawberries, and framboise-like notes...another ethereal, sensationally complex, nuanced, medium-bodied Grenache...ripe, present tannins, a layered, building mouthfeel, and a gorgeous, smoky, meaty finish.

97James Suckling

Dried roses, plums, cherries, lemon zest and dried basil on the nose. It’s full-bodied with creamy tannins. Juicy, bright and savory with delicious layers of fruit and herbs. Hints of chocolate, too. Silky, supple finish.

96The Wine Advocate

...spiced cherry and smoked plum tones...notions of dusty roses, red peppercorn and dried potpourri. Medium to full-bodied, the palate is balanced with energetic acidity, a spicy, red-fruited expression and fine-grained, succulent tannins.

94Vinous / IWC

...aromas of brambly red berries, spices and rose petal. Silky and suave on entry, then fine-grained and intense in the middle palate, showing lovely floral high notes to its cherry and raspberry fruit flavors. Finishes juicy and penetrating, with firm but perfectly buffered tannins and lovely rising white-peppery persistence.

94Wine Enthusiast

...notes of strawberry, peat, potpourri, smoked meat, clay and soot. Fuller-feeling potpourri and orange rind flavors follow...finish just will not quit, kicking it up a notch.

REGION

United States, Washington, Walla Walla Valley

Walla Walla Valley AVA likes to call itself the Napa Valley of Washington, and given the concentration of well-reviewed wineries in the appellation, the comparison is understandable. The Walla Walla appellation is comprised of 340,000 acres, of which 1,200 acres are vineyards. Walla Walla is located in the southeastern corner of Washington and it extends slightly into northeastern Oregon. It is named after the Walla Walla River Valley, and the city of Walla Walla is the commercial center of Washington’s wine industry. The city was founded in the 1840s by the Hudson’s Bay Company as a trading post, but as early as the 1850s farmers were planting grapes for winemaking. Prohibition shuttered winemaking in the early 20th century, but a winemaking renaissance started in the 1970s when Leonetti Cellars, still one of the state’s most acclaimed wineries, started producing acclaimed Cabernet Sauvignon. Walla Walla’s AVA status was awarded in 1984 and today there are more than 100 wineries. Cabernet Sauvignon is the most frequently planted grape, followed by Merlot, Syrah, Cabernet Franc, Sangiovese Chardonnay and Viognier.