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2013 Casanova di Neri Brunello di Montalcino Tenuta Nuova

Removed from a professional wine storage facility; Purchased direct from winery

Ends Sunday, 7pm Pacific

RATINGS

98James Suckling

...intense blueberries and raspberries. Floral undertones and tons of citrus... Full-bodied, dense and layered. Polished tannins and fantastic fruit. The muscularity of the structure is what gives this wine focus and intensity...

97The Wine Advocate

...bold and expressive Brunello that displays tightly knit aromas of Morello cherry, spice, leather and balsam herb that are the building blocks...modern and sophisticated approach...the inner spirit and texture of Sangiovese is so fine and polished in its natural state... The personality of the grape shines through with a loud and confident voice.

96Wine Spectator

Sweet, ripe strawberry and cherry fruit melds seamlessly with the dense, refined structure of this red. Saline, licorice and spice accents add complexity as this lingers gracefully on the finish. Terrific harmony and expression.

95+ Vinous / IWC

... The youthfully reticent nose hints at flinty red cherry, blueberry, graphite, cedar and pepper. Then flavors similar to the aromas, and a tight acid spine and serious but polished tannins nicely extending and framing the brooding fruit notes and peppery flintiness on the long, deep, complex finish. A truly outstanding Tenuta Nuova Brunello...

REGION

Italy, Tuscany, Brunello di Montalcino

Brunello di Montalcino is regarded as one of Italy’s best appellations. Located in south central Tuscany below Chianti, the wines of Brunello di Montalcino DOCG are made of a Sangiovese clone called “brunello,” which means “little dark one,” a reference to the brown tones in the skin of the grape. Unlike some Tuscan appellations that allow other grapes to be blended with Sangiovese, Brunello di Montalcino is entirely Sangiovese. Montalcino itself is a picturesque, hill-top town not especially well known for wine production until the mid-19th century, when a local vineyard owner isolated the brunello clone and planted it. Other growers followed suit. Nevertheless it wasn’t until 1970s that wine enthusiasts started paying attention to Brunello di Montalcino, which by then was becoming an outstanding wine. Today there are 120 estates in the DOCG, up from about 25 estates in 1975. Brunellos in general are bigger, darker, more tannic and more powerful wines than Chiantis or most other Sangioveses. By law they must be aged for four years, and two of those years must be in wooden barrels.