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2014 Figgins Estate Red Wine

Removed from a professional wine storage facility

2 available
Bid *

Removed from a subterranean wine cellar; Purchased direct from winery; Consignor is original owner

6 available
Bid *
Ends Sunday, 7pm Pacific

RATINGS

94The Wine Advocate

... Cassis, blackcurrant, roasted herbs, graphite and scorched earth all give way to a full-bodied, structured, impressively balanced red that has polished tannin (and lots of them), a core of sweet fruit and a great finish...

93+ Stephen Tanzer

...aromas of cassis, redcurrant, licorice, fig and cocoa powder. Quite plush on entry, then powerful and dry in the middle, with the Petit Verdot component contributing focus and verticality...a note of dried fig. Finishes with strong black fruits and real mountain-style tannins...

93James Suckling

Impressive ripeness and freshness with violets, black olives and tarry notes across ripe plum and blackberry fruits. Sinewy tannins that deliver sleek power and carry ripe red- and black-fruit flavors long and even...

93Wine Enthusiast

...aromas of herb, dark fruit, spice and earth. The palate is big and bold, with rich fruit flavors and a firm lick of tannins.

90Wine Spectator

Tightly focused and densely structured, with black currant aromas and concentrated espresso, olive and spice flavors, finishing with firm tannins...

REGION

United States, Washington, Walla Walla Valley

Walla Walla Valley AVA likes to call itself the Napa Valley of Washington, and given the concentration of well-reviewed wineries in the appellation, the comparison is understandable. The Walla Walla appellation is comprised of 340,000 acres, of which 1,200 acres are vineyards. Walla Walla is located in the southeastern corner of Washington and it extends slightly into northeastern Oregon. It is named after the Walla Walla River Valley, and the city of Walla Walla is the commercial center of Washington’s wine industry. The city was founded in the 1840s by the Hudson’s Bay Company as a trading post, but as early as the 1850s farmers were planting grapes for winemaking. Prohibition shuttered winemaking in the early 20th century, but a winemaking renaissance started in the 1970s when Leonetti Cellars, still one of the state’s most acclaimed wineries, started producing acclaimed Cabernet Sauvignon. Walla Walla’s AVA status was awarded in 1984 and today there are more than 100 wineries. Cabernet Sauvignon is the most frequently planted grape, followed by Merlot, Syrah, Cabernet Franc, Sangiovese Chardonnay and Viognier.