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2014 Wayfarer Golden Mean Pinot Noir

Removed from a temperature and humidity controlled wine storage unit

Ends Sunday, 7pm Pacific

RATINGS

97Wine Enthusiast

Dark, brooding cinnamon and fleshy black plum provide an exciting, complex counterpoint to the rakish earthiness and exotic Asian spice going on in this full-bodied, explosively compelling wine, its minerality lingering...

94The Wine Advocate

...lovely floral nose of violets and roses over a core of red cherries and pomegranate with hints of cinnamon stick and toast. Medium to full-bodied, the palate is packed with perfumed red berry flavors with a solid frame of chewy tannins and seamless freshness, finishing on a spicy note.

94Jeb Dunnuck

... Incredibly perfumed, with raspberry, violets, peach and floral notes, this beauty is elegant, seamless and pure on the palate, with the good acidity, and a seamlessness that's hard to believe. It picks up more spice and forest floor notes with time in the glass, has a big core of sweet fruit, and impeccable overall balance.

REGION

United States, California, Sonoma County, Fort Ross-Seaview

Sonoma County is not an AVA, but it is a commonly used informal designation for wines made outside of more specific AVAs within Sonoma, which is a large wine producing region just west of Napa Valley. Though Sonoma is often overshadowed by its glamorous neighbor Napa Valley, it has a long history of wine production. The area specialized in jug wine until the mid-20th century, when Sonoma producers took a cue from Napa and started improving quality. Unlike Napa, where Cabernet Sauvignon is king, Sonoma specialized in Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Zinfandel, though excellent Cabs are produced too. There are at present 16 AVAs within Sonoma County, and, like much of the West Coast of the United States, new AVAs are created in Sonoma County with regularity. Some Sonoma appellations, such as the Russian River Valley, are renowned for Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.