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2015 Paolo Scavino Barolo Bric del Fiasc

Light label condition issue

ITEM 8565575 - Removed from a professional wine storage facility; Purchased from a private collector; Consignor is second owner

Bidder Amount Total
$85
Item Sold Amount Date
I8617387 1 $85 Jan 1, 2023
Front Item Photo

RATINGS

96James Suckling

The redcurrant-compote character really pops out here, before dried cranberries, licorice and spice box all come to the fore. Tannic and very expansive, sweeping through a whole array of red berries via linear acidity and wrapping itself up in a long finish.

95+ The Wine Advocate

...delivers structure, firmness and power... This is a classic interpretation of a historic cru, and the wine offers linear, crisp lines...

95Wine Spectator

The sweetness from ripe plum and cherry fruit offsets the broad swath of tannins. Energetic and focused, with leather, soy, iron and tobacco accents supporting the fruit. Feels balanced...

95Vinous / IWC

...dark and imposing on the palate... A Barolo of size and heft... Black cherry, smoke, leather, iron, licorice, menthol and graphite notes infuse the 2015 with layers of nuance to complement its brooding, sepia-toned personality nicely. The 2015 is a beguiling Barolo.

95Wine Enthusiast

Woodland berry, wild herbs and rose mingle with whiffs of eucalyptus and coffee bean on this focused red. On the linear, full-bodied palate, firm, close-grained tannins accompany dried cherry, licorice and an almost salty mineral note before a tight, mouthdrying finish.

18Jancis Robinson

...Integral vanilla-nut oak, then slate and fresh earth, savoury spice and wild-strawberry fruit. Richness of wild strawberry is beautifully balanced by brisk acidity. Firm, fine, resolving tannins are already becoming mouth-coating. In the ‘modern’ idiom, this is a classy wine. Lovely length and refinement.

PRODUCER

Paolo Scavino

Paolo Scavino is a 50-acre estate in the Langhe region of Piedmont, and it is one of the region’s most admired producers of Barolo. Established in 1921 by Paolo Scavino, it is today run by his son Enrico, his wife and their two daughters. The estate has vineyards in several parts of the Barolo appellation. Gambero Rosso, Italy’s leading wine journal, has written that Paolo Scavino’s “prestigious vineyards produce stunning Barolos (and) also Dolcettos, Barberas, Nebbiolo d’Albas and other excellent Langhe reds, all of which contribute to boost the winery’s reputation.” About 100,000 bottles are produced annually.

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.