Sign In

2016 Domaine Drouhin-Laroze Latricieres Chambertin

ITEM 8391672 - Removed from a temperature and humidity controlled wine cellar

Bidder Amount Total
$145
Item Sold Amount Date
I8427931 1 $140 Sep 11, 2022
Front Item Photo

RATINGS

94-96The Wine Advocate

The palate is medium-bodied, with layers of raspberry coulis and crushed strawberry laced with tobacco and a touch of spice, fanning out gloriously but with style on the finish.

92Wine Spectator

A supple, charming red, smoky and spicy, with black cherry and black currant flavors. Intense and balanced, but also firm enough to develop. Turns compact on the smoky finish.

91-94Burghound.com

A background application of wood surrounds the cool and airy aromas of dark cherry, plum, earth and a whisper of the sauvage.

PRODUCER

Domaine Drouhin-Laroze

Domaine Drouhin-Laroze is a 31-acre estate in Gevrey-Chambertin, Burgundy. It was founded in the mid-19th century by Jean-Baptiste Laroze and is today run by Philippe Drouhin, who is a descendant. (There is only a very distant family tie with the famous Drouhin negociant family.) The domaine owns Grand Cru parcels in Bonnes-Mares, Chambertin, Clos de Beze, Clos de Vougeot, Latricieres-Chambertin, Chapelle-Chambertin, Musigny and Gevrey-Chambertin. There are also Premier Cru parcels. Robert M. Parker Jr. has noted that the estate’s 3 acres in Clos Vougeot "are extraordinary."

REGION

France, Burgundy, Côte d'Or, Côte de Nuits Villages, Gevrey-Chambertin, Latricieres-Chambertin

Latricieres-Chambertin is an 18.2 acre Grand Cru vineyard in Gevrey-Chambertin. The vineyard is just south of Chambertin, and it is essentially flat. There are 12 property owners within Latricieres-Chambertin, which has been farmed as a vineyard since the 16th century. By acreage, the largest landowners are Camus, 3.75 acres; Joseph Faiveley, 3 acres; and Rossignol-Trapet, 1.9 acres.

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir, Grand Cru

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.