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2014 Hundred Acre Cherry Pie Huckleberry Snodgrass Pinot Noir

ITEM 8240010 - Removed from a temperature and humidity controlled wine storage unit

Bidder Quantity Amount Total
bykim 2 $58 $116
RoyalWel… 1 of 3 $57 $57
3 $55
Item Sold Amount Date
I8240010 2 $58 May 29, 2022
I8240010 1 $57 May 29, 2022
Front Item Photo

RATINGS

93Robert M. Parker Jr.

The fruit is ripe, the texture is terrific and they are gorgeous Pinot Noirs...

PRODUCER

Hundred Acre

Hundred Acre is owned by Jayson Woodbridge, a winemaker who has been defying conventional wisdom about winemaking for years. He started Hundred Acre winery in St. Helena, California, and the Hundred Acre winery in the Barossa Valley, Australia. He makes single-vineyard, highly limited wines in both places. In California Hundred Acre is a Cabernet Sauvignon released only to the winery’s s mailing list. Hundred Acre’s first California vintage in 2000 earned praise from reviewers, and more recent vintages have earned very high scores from Robert M. Parker Jr., among others. Hundred Acre’s signature wine from California is the Kayli Morgan Vineyard Cab. The signature AU wine is the single vineyard Ancient Way Shiraz. Woodbridge is also the entrepreneur behind the Cherry Pie and Layer Cake wine labels. Cherry Pie is a Pinot Noir from Carneros and Layer Cake is a value-priced portfolio of varietals.

REGION

United States, California, Sonoma, Sonoma Coast

Sonoma Coast AVA runs from San Pablo Bay in the south to Mendocino County in the north. It includes 7,000 vineyard acres and earned AVA status in 1987. Its proximity to the Pacific Ocean means it gets double the rainfall of nearby inland appellations and the ocean gives the appellation a relatively cool climate. Chardonnay and Pinot Noir can thrive in these conditions, and there are numerous producers making critically acclaimed Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.