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2009-2010 La Spinetta

6-bottle Mixed Lot, Wood Case

See item details for bottle notes

ITEM 8094229 - Removed from a temperature and humidity controlled wine cellar

Bidder Amount Total
nycirish $480 $480
$480
Item Sold Amount Date
I8094229 1 $480 Jan 23, 2022
Front Item Photo
Front Item Photo

2009 La Spinetta Barbaresco Starderi

RATINGS

93Wine Spectator

Fresh and aromatic, exhibiting floral, berry, eucalyptus and spice flavors before the tough tannins take over. Powerful and muscular, this closes down on the finish.

93+ Vinous / IWC

...bursting with energy... ...hugely appealing wine that only needs time to shed some tannin. Raspberry jam, flowers, mint and cloves are followed by darker, more brooding aromas and flavors. As always, the Starderi is the richest and most imposing of the Spinetta Barbareschi. (October 2012)

PRODUCER

La Spinetta

Founded in 1977 in the Piedmont region, La Spinetta is a family-run wine proudcer that mixes modern techniques with old world tradition. It is also one of Italy’s most admired, innovative and modern wineries. It has won 34 prestigious Three Glass awards in 22 years from Italy’s best-known wine journal, Gambero Rosso. Only Gaja has won more. La Spinetta is owned by brothers Carlo, Bruno and Giorgio Rivetti, and Giorgio is also head winemaker. The producer now has three properties, two in Piedmont and one in Tuscany, and owns a total of 412 acres of vineyards. La Spinetta produces nearly 650,000 bottles a year, of which about 30% is Moscato, 24% is Sangiovese, 22% is Barbera, 10% is Pin (a blend of Nebbiolo and Barbera). The remainder of the production is Barolo, Barbera and Chardonnay. Reviewers are invariably impressed with the Barolos, Barberas and Barbarescos, and typically describe them using such terms as “ravishing” and “gorgeous.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barbaresco

Barbaresco is one of the two most acclaimed DOCGs in Piedmont, the other being Barolo. Located just a few miles north of Barolo, Barbaresco is a small town of fewer than 700 people and 1,680 vineyard acres, making it less than half the size of the Barolo DOCG. The other communes in this DOCG of rolling hills are Neive and Treiso. As in Barolo, the DOCG requires that Barbaresco DOCG wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. By the late 20th century respected producers were making outstanding Nebbiolos, as well as Nebbiolo blends that do not carry the DOCG label. Barbaresco was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to a DCOG in 1980. DOCG Barbaresco must be aged a minimum of two years, with a minimum of one year in wood. Barbarescos are regarded as more subtle and refined than Barolos, and more approachable when young.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.

VINTAGE

Front Item Photo

2009 La Spinetta Barbaresco Starderi

Light label condition issue

RATINGS

93Wine Spectator

Fresh and aromatic, exhibiting floral, berry, eucalyptus and spice flavors before the tough tannins take over. Powerful and muscular, this closes down on the finish.

93+ Vinous / IWC

...bursting with energy... ...hugely appealing wine that only needs time to shed some tannin. Raspberry jam, flowers, mint and cloves are followed by darker, more brooding aromas and flavors. As always, the Starderi is the richest and most imposing of the Spinetta Barbareschi. (October 2012)

PRODUCER

La Spinetta

Founded in 1977 in the Piedmont region, La Spinetta is a family-run wine proudcer that mixes modern techniques with old world tradition. It is also one of Italy’s most admired, innovative and modern wineries. It has won 34 prestigious Three Glass awards in 22 years from Italy’s best-known wine journal, Gambero Rosso. Only Gaja has won more. La Spinetta is owned by brothers Carlo, Bruno and Giorgio Rivetti, and Giorgio is also head winemaker. The producer now has three properties, two in Piedmont and one in Tuscany, and owns a total of 412 acres of vineyards. La Spinetta produces nearly 650,000 bottles a year, of which about 30% is Moscato, 24% is Sangiovese, 22% is Barbera, 10% is Pin (a blend of Nebbiolo and Barbera). The remainder of the production is Barolo, Barbera and Chardonnay. Reviewers are invariably impressed with the Barolos, Barberas and Barbarescos, and typically describe them using such terms as “ravishing” and “gorgeous.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barbaresco

Barbaresco is one of the two most acclaimed DOCGs in Piedmont, the other being Barolo. Located just a few miles north of Barolo, Barbaresco is a small town of fewer than 700 people and 1,680 vineyard acres, making it less than half the size of the Barolo DOCG. The other communes in this DOCG of rolling hills are Neive and Treiso. As in Barolo, the DOCG requires that Barbaresco DOCG wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. By the late 20th century respected producers were making outstanding Nebbiolos, as well as Nebbiolo blends that do not carry the DOCG label. Barbaresco was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to a DCOG in 1980. DOCG Barbaresco must be aged a minimum of two years, with a minimum of one year in wood. Barbarescos are regarded as more subtle and refined than Barolos, and more approachable when young.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.

VINTAGE

Front Item Photo

2010 La Spinetta Langhe Nebbiolo

RATINGS

90Wine Spectator

Balsamic and underbrush flavors surround the core of cherry in this firmly structured, sinewy red. There's ample fruit, imparting a lasting balance...

90Stephen Tanzer

Complex nose melds plum, redcurrant, raspberry, tobacco, sage and smoked meat, plus a flinty element. Quite primary but already nuanced, showing an attractive juicy quality to its red fruit and leather flavors... noteworthy persistence...

PRODUCER

La Spinetta

Founded in 1977 in the Piedmont region, La Spinetta is a family-run wine proudcer that mixes modern techniques with old world tradition. It is also one of Italy’s most admired, innovative and modern wineries. It has won 34 prestigious Three Glass awards in 22 years from Italy’s best-known wine journal, Gambero Rosso. Only Gaja has won more. La Spinetta is owned by brothers Carlo, Bruno and Giorgio Rivetti, and Giorgio is also head winemaker. The producer now has three properties, two in Piedmont and one in Tuscany, and owns a total of 412 acres of vineyards. La Spinetta produces nearly 650,000 bottles a year, of which about 30% is Moscato, 24% is Sangiovese, 22% is Barbera, 10% is Pin (a blend of Nebbiolo and Barbera). The remainder of the production is Barolo, Barbera and Chardonnay. Reviewers are invariably impressed with the Barolos, Barberas and Barbarescos, and typically describe them using such terms as “ravishing” and “gorgeous.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Langhe

Piedmont’s name means “foot of the mountain” and it aptly describes Piedmont’s location near the Alps, just east of France and south of Switzerland. For admirers of Nebbiolo wines, Piedmont is Italy’s most exalted region, since it is home to Barolo and Barbaresco. Barolo and Barbaresco are names of towns as well as names of the two most prestigious Piedmont DOCGs. Piedmont, with 142,000 vineyard acres, has seven DOCGs and fifty DOCs, the highest number of DOCS in any Italian wine zone. Despite its relatively northern location, its sometimes cool and frequently foggy weather, Piedmont produces mostly red wines. The Nebbiolo grape thrives in this climate and in fact takes its name from the Italian word for fog, “nebbia.” With its rich buttery food, majestic red wines and complicated vineyard system, Piedmont is often thought of as the Burgundy of Italy. As in Burgundy, Piedmont vineyards generally have well-established boundaries, and the vineyards are often divided into smaller parcels owned by several families. Though Nebbiolo is considered the most “noble” Piedmont grape, Barbera is actually the most widely planted grape. Dolcetto is the third most common red grape. White wines in Piedmont are made from Arneis, Cortese, Erbaluce and Moscato. Though Barolo and Barbaresco are the stars of the region, the easy-to-drink, sparkling “spumante” and “frizzante” wines of the Asti DOCG are the most widely produced. There are also Piedmont Indicazione Geographica Tipica (IGT) wines that are often an innovative blend of traditional and non-traditional grapes. This relatively new appellation status was started in 1992 as an attempt to give an official classification to Italy’s newer blends that do fit the strict requirements of DOC and DOCG classifications. IGT wines may use the name of the region and varietal on their label or in their name.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.