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1997 Marchesi Antinori Tignanello

Light capsule condition issue; very top shoulder fill; light label condition issue

ITEM 7983079 - Removed from a subterranean, temperature and humidity controlled residential cellar

Bidder Amount Total
EAJ $215 $215
frcar5 $205 $0
mamil1 $195 $0
$195
Item Sold Amount Date
I7986139 1 $185 Oct 31, 2021
I7986140 1 $195 Oct 31, 2021
I7986140 1 $205 Oct 31, 2021
I7983079 1 $215 Oct 24, 2021
I7972655 1 $215 Oct 10, 2021
I7973716 1 $175 Oct 10, 2021
I7961606 4 $175 Sep 26, 2021
I7942652 1 $185 Sep 5, 2021
I7939296 2 $185 Sep 5, 2021
I7937448 5 $185 Aug 29, 2021
Front Item Photo

RATINGS

95Wine Spectator

A fabulous Tuscan red, young and racy. Deep dark ruby in color, with focused aromas of blackberries, wood and very ripe fruit. Full-bodied, with loads of velvety tannins and a long, long finish.

93Robert M. Parker Jr.

...expansive nose of black currants, cherry compote, vanillin, and earth. Sweet, jammy, and opulently-textured, this expansive, concentrated, low acid wine is flashy and gorgeously-proportioned.

93Vinous / IWC

Dense, round and velvety on the palate, with expanding flavors.

17.5Jancis Robinson

Well mannered blend on the nose. Attractive, well mannered... it would make a good introduction to Sangiovese. Slight bitterness on the finish. Not especially long or intense but very well made.

2 BicchieriGambero Rosso

...a memorable vintage, shows a distinction that we haven't encountered since the '93, but perhaps even since the '88...

PRODUCER

Marchesi Antinori

Marchesi Antinori is synonymous with the best of Italian winemaking. The Antinori family has been in the wine producing business for 26 generations and it now one of the most successful and admired producers in Italy. Based in Tuscany and Umbria, the family has in recent decades bought estates in other parts of Italy as well as the United States. The business is led by Marchese Piero Antinori, who is respected for his passionate attention to tradition and terroir as well as his interest in innovation and new ideas. Antinori originally made its reputation by producing Chianti Classico, though these days it is equally known for its Super Tuscans -- Guado Al Tasso Bolgheri, Solaia and Tignanello. Super Tuscans are blends of Cabernet Sauvignon, Sangiovese, Cabernet Franc, Merlot or Syrah, and were among the first blended wines in Italy. Marchesi Antinori owns about 4,000 acres of vineyards and produces between 40,000 and 50,000 cases of its three Super Tuscans annually.

REGION

Italy, Tuscany

Tuscany, or Toscana in Italian, is Italy’s best-known wine region and its most diverse. Historically Sangiovese was the primary grape grown in Tuscany and Chianti was considered the purest expression of Sangiovese. Sangiovese and its many clones are still important, and they are the grapes used for the Tuscan appellations of Brunello di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Morellino di Scansano, Chianti, Chianti Classico and Carmignano. But in the last 50 years innovative producers, many of them in southwestern Tuscany in the area called Maremma, have also planted Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc. The tradition defying producers have blended those varietals with Sangiovese to produce dazzling wines that do not conform to Italy’s appellation regulations. Such wines are called Super Tuscans and cannot be labeled with either of Italy’s highest level quality designations, which are in order of status Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantia, (DOCG), and Denominazione di Origine Controllata, (DOC). (This has not at all hindered the demand for Super Tuscans, some of which are consistently among the world’s most admired and well-reviewed wines.) Tuscany has six DOCG appellations and thirty-four DOCs. Though famous for its red wines, Tuscany also produces whites made primarily from Trebbiano and Vernaccia. There are also many Tuscan Indicazione Geographica Tipica (IGT) wines that are often an innovative blend of traditional and non-traditional grapes. This relatively new appellation status was started in 1992 as an attempt to give an official classification to Italy’s many newer blends that do fit the strict requirements of DOC and DOCG classifications. IGT wines may use the name of the region and varietal on their label or in their name.