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2006 Roar Wines Garys' Vineyard Pinot Noir

ITEM 7955690 - Removed from a subterranean, temperature and humidity controlled residential cellar; Purchased direct from winery

Bidder Amount Total
Cajunwine $50 $50
$50
Item Sold Amount Date
I7955690 1 $50 Sep 19, 2021
Front Item Photo

RATINGS

94Robert M. Parker Jr.

...offers up scents of Chinese black tea, plums, soy, Asian spices, blackberries, and graphite. It exhibits a broad yet elegant mouthfeel, tremendous concentration, and no hard edges.

PRODUCER

Roar Wines

Roar is in the Santa Lucia Highlands of California’s upper Central Coast. It is owned and operated by Gary and Rosella Franscioni, who both grew up in the nearby agricultural communities. They have owned and managed vineyards since the 1990s but in 2001 decided to make their own wine. Roar grows and produces Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Viognier and Syrah. The estate’s limited-production wines earn glowing reviews. The Wine Advocate called the estate’s wines “sublime, elegant…”

REGION

United States, California, Central Coast, Santa Lucia Highlands

Santa Lucia Highlands AVA is a 12-mile long, narrow strip of an appellation wedged along the eastern hillsides of the Santa Lucia mountain range. Given its proximity to Big Sur and the Gabilan Mountain Range to the northeast, Santa Lucia a cool-climate wine growing district. Morning sun is often followed by maritime winds and fog in the afternoon, a weather pattern that prolongs the growing season and means long, gentle ripening of the grapes. Spanish missionaries planted vineyards in the district in the 18th century, but it wasn’t until the 1970s that modern winemakers planted vineyards and began making high quality wine. The district received AVA status in 1991 and today there are 6,000 vineyard acres in the Santa Lucia Highlands. Pinot Noir is the dominant grape planted, followed by Chardonnay and Riesling.

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.