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1959 Comte de Vogue Musigny Vieilles Vignes

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RATINGS

*****Michael Broadbent

...fabulous depth and intensity; glorious, warm, luscious bouquet...fairly sweet, full-bodied...with lavender-and-old-lace flavour and aftertaste. Good balance and length. (Drink) now to beyond 2000 (Review from 1984)

PRODUCER

Comte de Vogue

Like many of France’s historic wine producers, Domaine Comte de Georges de Vogue, as it is formally known, has been in the same family for more than 500 years. The domaine, based in Chambolle-Musigny, Burgundy, produces Grand Cru Pinot Noir and the winemaker since 1985 has been Francois Millet, who is credited with crafting exceptional wines. Comte de Vogue’s premier wine is Musigny Vieilles Vignes, though the domaine also make Chardonnay and other Pinot Noirs. The average age of the vines is 40 to 50 years. About 1,000 cases of Musigny Vieilles Vignes are produced each year.

REGION

France, Burgundy, Côte d'Or, Côte de Nuits-Villages, Chambolle-Musigny, Le Musigny

Musigny is considered one of the greatest vineyards in the Cote d’Or, in Burgundy. At 26.5 acres it includes two sections, Grand Musigny and Les Petits Musigny. The vineyard is 260 to 300 meters in elevation and the soil is unusual for the region, a mix of limestone and red clay. Comte de Vogue owns about three-quarters of the vineyard, with a holding of 17 acres. The next largest landowners are Jacques-Frederic Mugnier, with 3.2 acres; and Jacques Prieur with 1.7 acres. Also noteworthy is Leroy’s tiny .7 acre holding. Though most of the vineyard is planted to Pinot Noir, Comte de Vogue plants a small parcel of Chardonnay, which is sold as Bourgogne blanc due to the relatively youth of the Chardonnay vines. Wine writer Clive Coates has written that “at its best the red wine (of Musigny) can be quite simply the most delicious wine to be found in Burgundy.”

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir, Grand Cru

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.