Sign In

2019 Château d'Yquem Ygrec "Y"

Not Currently In Auction

Latest Sale Price

July 16, 2023 - $165

Estimate

RATINGS

96Wine Spectator

Distinctive, with jasmine and elderflower notes leading off, followed by a racy set of white peach, white ginger and lemon shortbread notes. Feels pure and streamlined through the very long finish.

PRODUCER

Château d'Yquem

Château d’Yquem was the only wine in the Sauternes/Barsac area to receive a First Growth distinction in the original and still highly influential 1855 Bordeaux classification. The region has been famous for many centuries for its sweet white wines, now considered dessert wines, and Château d’Yquem has always been the undisputed king of Sauternes. The estate also makes a dry white Bordeaux called Ygrec “Y,” which receives excellent reviews despite being far less well known than the famous dessert wine made at the estate. Château d’Yquem sits on a small hill and has an ideal terroir and perfect microclimate. According to local lore the 19th century proprietors of Château d’Yquem were the first French winemakers to recognize the value of so-called “noble rot,” which is a benevolent form of botrytis bunch rot, a fungal attack on the vines and grapes. Château d’Yquem includes 254.2 acres of vineyards planted to 80% Semillon and 20% Sauvignon. On average the vines are 30 years old and about 110,000 bottles are produced each year. The distinguished winemaker and estate director Pierre Lurton is President and CEO. Lurton is also Managing Director of Cheval-Blanc.

REGION

France, Bordeaux

Bordeaux is the world’s most famous fine-wine producing region. Even non-wine drinkers recognize the names of Bordeaux’s celebrated wines, such as Margaux and Lafite-Rothschild. Located near the Atlantic coast in southwest France, the region takes its name from the seaport city of Bordeaux, a wine trading center with an outstanding site on the Garonne River and easy access to the Atlantic. Like most French wine regions, Bordeaux’s first vineyards were planted by the Romans more than 2,000 years ago, then tended by medieval monks. Aristocrats and nobility later owned the region’s best estates and today estates are owned by everyone from non-French business conglomerates to families who have been proprietors for generations. Bordeaux has nearly 280,000 acres of vineyards, 57 appellations and 10,000 wine-producing châteaux. Bordeaux is bifurcated by the Gironde Estuary into so-called “right bank” and “left bank” appellations. Bordeaux’s red wines are blends of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Petit Verdot, Cabernet Franc and Malbec. It also makes white wines of Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle. There are several classification systems in Bordeaux. All are attempts to rank the estates based on the historic quality of the wines.