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1981 J.F. Mugnier Chambolle-Musigny Les Amoureuses

Light capsule condition issue; 3 cm ullage; light label condition issue

ITEM 8576717 - Removed from a professional wine storage facility

Bidder Amount Total
$855
Item Sold Amount Date
I8615881 1 $810 Jan 1, 2023

PRODUCER

J.F. Mugnier

Domaine Jacques Frederic Mugnier is comprised of nearly 40 acres in Chambolle-Musigny, in Burgundy. The domain has the second largest holding of vines in the Musigny vineyard, which makes it a major landholder in the region. Only its neighbor Comte de Vogue has a larger holding in the prestigious Musigny vineyard. Domaine J.F. Mugnier was founded in 1863 when Frederic Mugnier, a spirits dealer from Dijon, purchased land in Chambolle-Musigny. The domaine has remained in the family through the generations, though the size of the domaine has changed. Today the domaine is run by Frederic Mugnier, who was an airline pilot and oil engineer before devoting himself full time to the family enterprise. J.F. Mugnier’s wines “are some of the most delicious, intriguing Pinot Noirs in Burgundy,” according to Robert M. Parker Jr. "Especially noteworthy are the Grand Crus, Musigny and Bonnes Mares."

REGION

France, Burgundy, Côte d'Or, Côte de Nuits-Villages, Chambolle-Musigny, Les Amoureuses

Les Amoureuses is a Premier Cru vineyard in the Chambolle-Musigny appellation in Burgundy. The 13-5 acre vineyard lies down slope form the Grand Cru Le Musigny. Because of its excellent quality, Les Amoureuses is regarded more like a Grand Cru than a Premier Cru. The largest landholder is Robert Groffier et Fils, who owns nearly 3 acres. Clive Coates has written that “Les Amoureuses is really a sort of younger brother to Musigny itself; perfumed, silky smooth, intense and soft rather than brutal and muscular, and with real finesse.”

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir, 1er (Premier) Cru

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.