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1988, 1996-2001, 2003, 2008 Barolo & Barbaresco Professional Collector's Set

12-bottle Mixed Lot

See item details for bottle notes

ITEM 8572112 - Removed from a professional wine storage facility; Purchased at auction

Bidder Amount Total
$2,995
Front Item Photo
Front Item Photo

1996 Armando Parusso Barolo Bussia Vigna Rocche

RATINGS

92-94Robert M. Parker Jr.

...excellent wine. In addition to the tar, smoke, dried herbs, leather, and cherry fruit aromas, it reveals a distinctive mineral/powdered rock character. A full-bodied, powerful Barolo that possesses superb richness, a multidimensional...

91Wine Spectator

Lots of blackberry and violet, with hints of toasty oak. Medium- to full-bodied, with silky tannins and a long, delicious finish. Elegant and caressing.

91-94Stephen Tanzer

Raspberry, minerals, dark chocolate, shoe polish and smoky oak on the nose. Fat and silky, with outstanding sweetness. Here the strong tannins offer uncanny sweetness. Seductive and strong.

PRODUCER

Armando Parusso

Armando Parusso is an estate in the Langhe region of Northern Italy. It is run by Marco Parusso and his sister Tiziana. The estate was founded in 1970 and has 75 acres of vineyards. Some 120,000 bottles of Barolo, primarily, are produced annually. Though relatively small, this estate has been earning high compliments from wine journals, including the influential Italian Gambero Rosso, which calls it an estate “which boasts some of the best terroirs in thee entire zone.” The journal added that the wines “have achieved fine stylistic harmony annd balance.” Robert M. Parker Jr. wrote in 2010 that “I was deeply impressed with the wines I tasted from Marco Parusso this year. Marco Parusso is one of Piedmont’s most relentless explorers, and every new vintage seems to bring with it a new twist.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.
Front Item Photo

2000 Azelia Barolo San Rocco

RATINGS

95Wine Spectator

Full-throttle style of Barolo with prune, leather, grilled meat and spices on the nose. Full-bodied, chewy and ultra-ripe, with wild vanilla and intense fruit on the palate. Voluptuous and showy. Best after 2007. 950 cases made.

18.5Jancis Robinson

Extremely lively - great lift. Sweet start with admirable complexity. Masses of tannin - very chewy, but not overwhelming the fruit.

91The Wine Advocate

...possesses a powerful and alcoholic nose of herbs and tobacco, tar and licorice, and its long and concentrated palate.

PRODUCER

Azelia

Azelia is a 40-acre estate in Castiglione Falletto, in Langhe. It dates to 1920 when Lorenzo Scavino began making wine from the family vineyards. Today the fifth generation of the Scavino family owns and operates the estate, which produces about 80,000 bottles a year. Azelia is best known for its Barolos, which often earn 3 bicchieri, the highest ratings possible from Gambero Rosso, the Italian wine journal. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that “Azelia Barolos combine power and elegance with a level of virtuosity matched by few in the region.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.
Front Item Photo

2001 Azelia Barolo San Rocco

RATINGS

95Wine Spectator

Very concentrated and complex on the nose with blackberry, dark chocolate and toasted oak aromas. Full-bodied and very ripe, with loads of fruit and a long, caressing finish. A powerful and rich wine...

93The Wine Advocate

...complex nose of smoke, scorched earth, minerals and spices.

90+ Stephen Tanzer

Full, bright red. Red fruits, coffee and nuts on the nose. Fresher and tighter than the Bricco Fiasco, with nicely delineated red fruit flavors. A more backward style, and quite firm, even a bit youthfully tough, on the back end...

PRODUCER

Azelia

Azelia is a 40-acre estate in Castiglione Falletto, in Langhe. It dates to 1920 when Lorenzo Scavino began making wine from the family vineyards. Today the fifth generation of the Scavino family owns and operates the estate, which produces about 80,000 bottles a year. Azelia is best known for its Barolos, which often earn 3 bicchieri, the highest ratings possible from Gambero Rosso, the Italian wine journal. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that “Azelia Barolos combine power and elegance with a level of virtuosity matched by few in the region.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.
Front Item Photo

2000 Bartolo Mascarello Barolo

RATINGS

95Wine Spectator

Gorgeous, exotic nose, with plums, prunes, cedar and mushrooms. Full-bodied and hedonistic, with loads of ripe fruit and spices underneath. Long and velvety. This is magnificent...

92Stephen Tanzer

Good medium red. Complex aromas of dried fruits, leather, smoke and marzipan... ...Offers a near-decadent sweetness that carries through on the back end, where the tannins are similarly sweet and broad...

PRODUCER

Bartolo Mascarello

Bartolo Mascarello is a 12-acre estate in Barolo, in the Piedmont region of Italy. The estate was founded in 1919 by Giulio Mascarello and was known as Cantina Mascarello until Giulio’s death in 1981. Giulio’s son Bartolo began working with his father in the late 1940s and Bartolo changed the label to "Bartolo Mascarello” in 1982. Until his passing in 2005 Bartolo continued to make traditional, widely-admired Barolos in the small winery under his house. After his death, his daughter Maria Teresa took over the winery, and she continues to make Barolo in the plain but distinctive style championed by her father and grandfather. The estate produces just one Barolo, which is made from a mix of grapes from the family’s four Nebbiolo plots in Cannubi, Rue, Roche di Annunziata and San Lorenzo. The fruit from the four vineyards is co-fermented in concrete vats by indigenous yeasts without temperature controls. Other wines produced are Barbera d’Alba, Dolcetto d’Alba, Langhe Nebbiolo and Langhe Freisa. Gambero Rosso, Italy’s leading wine journal, has noted that Maria Teresa has followed her father’s legacy “with that special Mascarello way of crafting truly authentic bottles from traditional, unhurried maceration and aging in large barrels. (These are) wines that will endure for decades.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.
Front Item Photo

1998 Bruno Giacosa Barbaresco Rabaja

Light label condition issue

RATINGS

95Robert M. Parker Jr.

Complex notes of soy, earth, candied cherry fruit, and cigar box emerge from this concentrated yet intellectually challenging effort. Full-bodied, with a soft attack as well as a tannic finish...

92Wine Spectator

A subtle and powerful red. Lovely aromas of raspberries, strawberries and flowers. Medium- to full-bodied, with muscular tannins and a long, spicy finish. Best after 2005.

PRODUCER

Bruno Giacosa

Bruno Giacosa, in Neive, is one of the finest producers of Barolos and Barbarescos. The 44-acre estate is owned by the Giacosa family and until his death in 2018 at age 88, Bruno Giacosa himself ran the vineyard and cellar. His daughter Bruna joined the family business in 1982 and has long handled all business aspects. Bruna will continue to run the estate. Bruno was considered a brilliant producer by his colleagues in the region, and for many years made outstanding wines with purchased grapes. These days, however, the family owns its own vineyards and grows Nebbiolo d’Alba, Barbera d’Alba, and Dolcetto d’Alba. About 400,000 bottles are produced annually. Gambero Rosso, Italy’s leading wine journal, has awarded Bruno Giacosa wines its highest rating, The Three Glass (or three bicchieri) award. Robert M. Parker Jr. has noted Bruno Giacosa’s “consistent brilliance.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barbaresco

Barbaresco is one of the two most acclaimed DOCGs in Piedmont, the other being Barolo. Located just a few miles north of Barolo, Barbaresco is a small town of fewer than 700 people and 1,680 vineyard acres, making it less than half the size of the Barolo DOCG. The other communes in this DOCG of rolling hills are Neive and Treiso. As in Barolo, the DOCG requires that Barbaresco DOCG wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. By the late 20th century respected producers were making outstanding Nebbiolos, as well as Nebbiolo blends that do not carry the DOCG label. Barbaresco was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to a DCOG in 1980. DOCG Barbaresco must be aged a minimum of two years, with a minimum of one year in wood. Barbarescos are regarded as more subtle and refined than Barolos, and more approachable when young.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.
Front Item Photo

1996 Bruno Giacosa Barolo Falletto Riserva

RATINGS

3 BicchieriGambero Rosso

The wide range of aromas on the nose embrace dried flowers, cloves, juniper berries and liquorice while the superbly rich palate evinces all the austere, full-bodied personality of a Barolo from Serralunga.

98Robert M. Parker Jr.

..offers a tight but promising nose of road tar, scorched earth, truffles, blackberries, cherries, and espresso. This muscular, massive wine gave me chills. It is an exquisite, virtually perfect Barolo..

98+ Stephen Tanzer

A wine of monumental scale but utterly suave and clear as a bell thanks to bracing balancing acids and superb tannic backbone.

95Wine Spectator

Terrific aromas of crushed fruit, Indian spices and dried flowers follow though to a full-bodied palate, with silky tannins and a long, long finish.

PRODUCER

Bruno Giacosa

Bruno Giacosa, in Neive, is one of the finest producers of Barolos and Barbarescos. The 44-acre estate is owned by the Giacosa family and until his death in 2018 at age 88, Bruno Giacosa himself ran the vineyard and cellar. His daughter Bruna joined the family business in 1982 and has long handled all business aspects. Bruna will continue to run the estate. Bruno was considered a brilliant producer by his colleagues in the region, and for many years made outstanding wines with purchased grapes. These days, however, the family owns its own vineyards and grows Nebbiolo d’Alba, Barbera d’Alba, and Dolcetto d’Alba. About 400,000 bottles are produced annually. Gambero Rosso, Italy’s leading wine journal, has awarded Bruno Giacosa wines its highest rating, The Three Glass (or three bicchieri) award. Robert M. Parker Jr. has noted Bruno Giacosa’s “consistent brilliance.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.
Front Item Photo

1999 Giuseppe E Figlio (Mauro) Mascarello Barolo Monprivato

RATINGS

*****Decanter Magazine (stars)

Arguably the pick of the traditionalist bunch; sweet, intense, raspberry-and-violet nose; fine attack but rich and velvety; very elegant, ripe and persistent. Up to 2020.

93+ Stephen Tanzer

Complex, pure aromas of wild red berries, camphor, tar, dried rose, tobacco and nutty oak. Very sweet on entry, then silky, deep and rich in the middle, with impressive depth and breadth.

92The Wine Advocate

The nose is quite complex, with much mint, spice, anise, and dried roses, and the concentrated, licorice-laced flavors, mouthfilling and with a significant tannic clout, are quite plush and sensual, but long and strong as well.

PRODUCER

Giuseppe E Figlio (Mauro) Mascarello

Giuseppe e Figlio (Mauro) Mascarello is one of the most admired estates in the Langhe region of Piedmont. The 42-acre estate is in Monchiero. It was founded in 1881 by Giuseppe Mascarello and each generation since has taken over the estate and made improvements. The current owner is Mauro Mascarello, who worked with his father, also a Giuseppe, until his father’s death. Mascarello’s flagship wine is its Barolo Monprivato, which comes from what Robert M. Parker Jr. calls the “superbly positioned Monprivato vineyard that is the source of (the estate’s) two top wines, the Barolo Monprivato and the Barolo Riserva Ca’ d’Morissio.” The estate also makes Barbera and Dolcetto. About 50,000 bottles are produced annually.

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.
Front Item Photo

1988 Luciano Sandrone Barolo Cannubi Boschis

RATINGS

94The Wine Advocate

...explodes from the glass with a potent, brooding nose of smoke, tar, leather, cocoa and tobacco.

PRODUCER

Luciano Sandrone

Luciano Sandrone winery was founded in 1978 when Luciano Sandrone bought a small vineyard in Italy’s Piedmont region. He began making wine in his parents’ garage, and by 1982 his Barolos were being distributed throughout Europe. Today the estate includes 67 acres of vineyards and it is run by Luciano with the help of his younger brother Luca and his daughter Barbara. The estate makes several highly regarded Barolos, as well as Nebbiolo, Barbera, and a red table wine. Luciano Sandrone is admired not only for his well-rated wines but his history of blending the best of modern and traditional winemaking. Gambero Rosso, Italy’s leading wine journal, notes that “the winery is an example of how to combine elegance, efficiency and respect for the environment.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.
Front Item Photo

2001 Luciano Sandrone Barolo Le Vigne

RATINGS

96The Wine Advocate

...fresh, vibrant & totally impeccable. Flowers, mint, minerals & juicy red berries are some of the many nuances that come to life... Seemingly endless layers of fruit flesh... leather, spices, licorice & flowers add further complexity...

96Wine Enthusiast

Great stuff, combining traditional Barolo flavors—dusty earth, leather, floral notes & cherries—with modern touches, like the supple tannins & hints of hickory smoke... intellectually challenging & complex while still delivering lush fruit.

95+ Vinous / IWC

Captivating aromas of raspberry, black cherry, gunflint, sweet spices, menthol and rose petal. Lush and concentrated, with sweet dark cherry and bitter chocolate flavors perked up by ripe raspberry, minerals and spices...

92Wine Spectator

Wonderful aromas of roses, berries and violets follow through to a full-bodied palate, with fine tannins and a pretty, caressing, sweet fruit finish. Pretty wine.

PRODUCER

Luciano Sandrone

Luciano Sandrone winery was founded in 1978 when Luciano Sandrone bought a small vineyard in Italy’s Piedmont region. He began making wine in his parents’ garage, and by 1982 his Barolos were being distributed throughout Europe. Today the estate includes 67 acres of vineyards and it is run by Luciano with the help of his younger brother Luca and his daughter Barbara. The estate makes several highly regarded Barolos, as well as Nebbiolo, Barbera, and a red table wine. Luciano Sandrone is admired not only for his well-rated wines but his history of blending the best of modern and traditional winemaking. Gambero Rosso, Italy’s leading wine journal, notes that “the winery is an example of how to combine elegance, efficiency and respect for the environment.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.
Front Item Photo

2003 Luciano Sandrone Barolo Le Vigne

RATINGS

93The Wine Advocate

...a full-bodied, soft-textured Barolo with lively color and plenty of ripe red fruit, menthol and spices. This is an especially fresh, vibrant wine for the vintage, with tannins that are particularly refined...

92Wine Spectator

Displays bright berry and truffle on the nose. Full-bodied, with fine tannins and a caressing finish. There's just a hint of new wood. Balanced and beautiful.

PRODUCER

Luciano Sandrone

Luciano Sandrone winery was founded in 1978 when Luciano Sandrone bought a small vineyard in Italy’s Piedmont region. He began making wine in his parents’ garage, and by 1982 his Barolos were being distributed throughout Europe. Today the estate includes 67 acres of vineyards and it is run by Luciano with the help of his younger brother Luca and his daughter Barbara. The estate makes several highly regarded Barolos, as well as Nebbiolo, Barbera, and a red table wine. Luciano Sandrone is admired not only for his well-rated wines but his history of blending the best of modern and traditional winemaking. Gambero Rosso, Italy’s leading wine journal, notes that “the winery is an example of how to combine elegance, efficiency and respect for the environment.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.
Front Item Photo

2008 Mario Marengo Barolo Vecchia Vigna delle Brunate

RATINGS

92Vinous / IWC

91James Suckling

Walnuts and dark fruits on the nose follow through to prunes, spices and coffee.

17.5Jancis Robinson

Lots of concentration and fine tannic waves. Very well-absorbed oak and great balance. So easy to like, although it closes up on the finish. Intense sweetness and concentration.

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.
Front Item Photo

1997 Paolo Scavino Barolo Carobric

RATINGS

97Wine Spectator

A giant of a wine. Intense aromas of prunes and spices, with hints of lilacs and cloves. Full-bodied and massive, with huge, soft tannins and a long, long finish. Very smoky and rich. Exotic, great wine.

93Robert M. Parker Jr.

...saturated garnet color with amber at the edge, in addition to intense aromas of coffee, smoke, kirsch, herbs, leather, and fruitcake. Full-bodied, with expansive, saturated layers of fruit, and abundant stuffing as well as richness.

2 BicchieriGambero Rosso

PRODUCER

Paolo Scavino

Paolo Scavino is a 50-acre estate in the Langhe region of Piedmont, and it is one of the region’s most admired producers of Barolo. Established in 1921 by Paolo Scavino, it is today run by his son Enrico, his wife and their two daughters. The estate has vineyards in several parts of the Barolo appellation. Gambero Rosso, Italy’s leading wine journal, has written that Paolo Scavino’s “prestigious vineyards produce stunning Barolos (and) also Dolcettos, Barberas, Nebbiolo d’Albas and other excellent Langhe reds, all of which contribute to boost the winery’s reputation.” About 100,000 bottles are produced annually.

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.

VINTAGE

1997 Paolo Scavino Barolo Carobric

305 cases produced