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2011 Taittinger Comtes de Champagne Blanc de Blancs

ITEM 8465754 - Removed from a professional wine storage facility; Purchased direct from a distributor

Bidder Quantity Amount Total
camwo 1 $160 $160
12 $160
Item Sold Amount Date
I8494374 11 $150 Oct 23, 2022
I8465754 1 $160 Oct 2, 2022
I8410485 4 $160 Aug 28, 2022
I8404244 5 $160 Aug 28, 2022
I8365137 3 $170 Aug 7, 2022
I8279963 2 $200 Jun 19, 2022
I8269466 2 $200 Jun 12, 2022
Front Item Photo

RATINGS

97James Suckling

A firm, fresh Comtes...composed palate...full-bodied with a racy mid-palate. Long and persistent. Very structured with phenolics and acidity. Minerally. Floral, too. Refreshing and energetic.

94The Wine Advocate

...aromas of orchard and stone fruit mingled with notions of pastry cream, blanched almonds and mandarin...medium to full-bodied, pillowy and fleshy, with a soft and enveloping profile, lively acids and a pretty pinpoint mousse.

18Jancis Robinson

Meaty, substantial, quite savoury evolution on the nose. Bone-dry finish but no shortage of rather captivating fruit before then. Very appetising with good steady bead and no aggressive froth.

PRODUCER

Taittinger

Taittinger is a Champagne house founded in 1734 in Reims. However it wasn’t until 1932 that the Taittinger family purchased the estate and renamed it after their family. Pierre Taittinger was a cavalry officer in World War I who returned from the war and fell in love with the Champagne region. He was able to buy the vineyards in 1932 and was soon buying more land. Today Taittinger Champagne owns 752 acres of vineyards, making it one of the largest in the region. The estate’s flagship wines are the Comtes de Champagne, made of 100% Chardonnay, and Comtes de Champagne Rose, made of 100% Pinot Noir. Taittinger is also noteworthy for its program of commissioning internationally acclaimed artists to make labels.

REGION

France, Champagne

Champagne is a small, beautiful wine growing region northeast of Paris whose famous name is misused a million times a day. As wine enthusiasts and all French people are well aware, only sparkling wines produced in Champagne from grapes grown in Champagne can be called Champagne. Sparkling wines produced anywhere else, including in other parts of France, must be called something besides Champagne. Champagne producers are justifiably protective of their wines and the prestige associated with true Champagne. Though the region was growing grapes and making wines in ancient times, it began specializing in sparkling wine in the 17th century, when a Benedictine monk named Dom Pierre Pérignon formulated a set guidelines to improve the quality of the local sparkling wines. Despite legends to the contrary, Dom Pérignon did not “invent” sparkling wine, but his rules about aggressive pruning, small yields and multiple pressings of the grapes were widely adopted, and by the 18th and 19th centuries Champagne had become the wine of choice in fashionable courts and palaces throughout Europe. Today there are 75,000 acres of vineyards in Champagne growing Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier. Champagne’s official appellation system classifies villages as Grand Cru or Premier Cru, though there are also many excellent Champagnes that simply carry the regional appellation. Along with well-known international Champagne houses there are numerous so-called “producer Champagnes,” meaning wines made by families who, usually for several or more generations, have worked their own vineyards and produced Champagne only from their own grapes.

VINTAGE

2011 Taittinger Comtes de Champagne Blanc de Blancs

Chardonnay Champagne