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2019 Sinegal Estate Pinot Noir

ITEM 8460771 - Removed from a professional wine storage facility

Bidder Amount Total
Eljugo $45 $45
$45
Item Sold Amount Date
I8460771 1 $45 Oct 2, 2022
Front Item Photo

PRODUCER

Sinegal Estate

Sinegal Estate was founded by David Sinegal, who in 2013 purchased the historic Inglewood estate in St. Helena. Sinegal, a former retail executive at Costco, Starbucks and other companies, updated the 30- acre, 19th century estate and brought in respected Napa winemaker Tony Biagi. Veteran viticulturalist Jim Barbour was hired as vineyard manager. The first commercial releases were 2013 Cabernet Sauvignons. The Inglewood estate, not to be confused with Inglenook Estate in Rutherford, was planted with vineyards in 1881. Sinegal and his team refurbished the vineyards, which are at various elevations from the valley floor up to the lower levels of the Mayacamas Mountains. Like a growing number of other new, artisanal Napa wineries producing just a few luxury wines, Sinegal Estate’s wines are available generally by mailing list only. The estate’s Cabernet Sauvignons and Cabernet Francs have impressed reviewers in their debut vintages. Robert M. Parker rated them in the mid to high-90s and noted that “These are all super-impressive wines, so consumers should get on the Sinegal bandwagon before it becomes better known.”

REGION

United States, California, Sonoma, Sonoma Coast

Sonoma Coast AVA runs from San Pablo Bay in the south to Mendocino County in the north. It includes 7,000 vineyard acres and earned AVA status in 1987. Its proximity to the Pacific Ocean means it gets double the rainfall of nearby inland appellations and the ocean gives the appellation a relatively cool climate. Chardonnay and Pinot Noir can thrive in these conditions, and there are numerous producers making critically acclaimed Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.