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2016 Vincent Girardin Chassagne Montrachet Clos de la Boudriotte

3-bottle Lot

ITEM 8316920 - Removed from a professional wine storage facility; Purchased direct from winery

Bidder Amount Total
$170
Front Item Photo
Front Item Photo

2016 Vincent Girardin Chassagne Montrachet Clos de la Boudriotte

RATINGS

92Wine Enthusiast

91+ The Wine Advocate

Aromas of violets, berry fruit, dark chocolate and spices...medium to full-bodied...with a generous core of succulent fruit, framed by powdery tannins and tangy acids...finish is pure, precise and perfumed.

PRODUCER

Vincent Girardin

Domaine Vincent Girardin is a 50-acre estate made up of 42 parcels in Burgundy’s Cote de Beaune. Vincent Girardin himself was born in Santenay, in the Cote de Beaune, and is an 11th generation winemaker. He started his own domaine in 1982 with just 5 acres of land, but he has added to the estate over the years, which he now runs with wife, Veronique. Robert M. Parker Jr. has called Girardin an “extremely talented winemaker” and notes that Girardin’s top grand and premier crus “are at the same quality level of those crafted by Burgundy’s other excellent domaines and negociants. What sets this firm apart are the bevy of delicious, eminently drinkable wines it produces from lesser known appellations, including its home village of Santenay.” The domain makes red and white Burgundies.

REGION

France, Burgundy, Côte d'Or, Côte de Beaune, Chassagne-Montrachet

Chassagne-Montrachet is the appellation that covers the communes of Chassagne-Montrachet and Remigny, and it is the southern-most of the Côte d’Or’s three great white wine appellations of Meursault, Puligny-Montrachet and Chassagne-Montrachet. With 1,200 acres of vineyards, it is one of the largest appellations in the region, and more than half the vineyard acreage is Grand Cru or Premier Cru. The three famous Grand Crus are Le Montrachet, Bâtard-Montrachet and Criots-Bâtard-Montrachet. There are also 16 main Premiers Crus, most of them considered very high quality, and village wines. One fact rarely noted is that historically the appellation produced more red than white wine. In the late 1990s the ratio of white to red wines changed, however, as more vineyards were converted from Pinot Noir to Chardonnay, a logical decision given the acclaim of the appellation’s whites. There are still intriguing red wines produced. Clive Coates wrote that the appellation’s white wines generally are “full and firm, more akin to Puligny than to the softer, rounder wines of Meursault.”

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir, 1er (Premier) Cru

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.