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2012 Joseph Drouhin Gevrey-Chambertin

ITEM 8308483 - Removed from a temperature and humidity controlled wine cellar; Purchased from a private collector

Bidder Quantity Amount Total
3 $65
Item Sold Amount Date
I8332141 1 $66 Jul 17, 2022
I8332141 2 $65 Jul 17, 2022
Front Item Photo

RATINGS

91Wine Enthusiast

This bold, well-structured wine is packed with both rich fruit and tannins. Dense black fruits are layered with a dry, firm structure...

90Wine Spectator

Focused and vivid, with cherry, strawberry and chalk notes permeating the linear, tensile profile. Though intense, this remains smooth and long.

16.5Jancis Robinson

Much more substance on the nose than the village Chambolle.

PRODUCER

Joseph Drouhin

Maison Joseph Drouhin is one of Burgundy’s most venerable estates. It was founded in 1880 by Joseph Drouhin, who bought a 100-year old negociant business and began acquiring parcels in such legendary appellations as Clos des Mouches and Clos de Vougeot. By the mid-20th century the 148-acre estate was being run by Robert Drouhin, who continued to acquire vineyards and improve the quality of the wine. (Robert also purchased 100 acres in Oregon’s Willamette Valley, where his daughter makes Oregon Pinot Noirs under the Domaine Drouhin label.) The maison makes Grand Cru, Premier Cru and villages wines in Chablis, Cote de Nuits, Cote de Beaune, Cote Chalonnaise, Maconnais and Beaujolais. Noted Burgundy expert Clive Coates has called the maison “one of the most perfectionist” of the Burgundy producers, and Robert M. Parker Jr. notes that Drouhin’s wines “are among the very best of the modern style of red and white Burgundies.”

REGION

France, Burgundy, Côte d'Or, Côte de Nuits Villages, Gevrey-Chambertin

Côte de Nuits is the northern part of the Côte d’Or and it includes the most famous vineyards and wine communes in the world. There are more Grand Cru appellations in the Côte de Nuits than anywhere else in Burgundy. Of the fourteen communes, or villages in the Côte de Nuits, six produce Grand Cru wines. They are Gevrey-Chambertin, Morey-St.-Denis, Chambolle-Musigny, Vougeot, Flagey-Échezeaux and Vosne-Romanee. Some of the vineyards within the Côte de Nuits are tiny, which adds to their prestige. The fabled Grand Cru vineyard La Romanee is barely two square acres. Altogether there are twenty-four Grand Cru vineyards. The region takes its name from the village of Nuits-Saint-Georges. Côtes de Nuits produces mostly reds from Pinot Noir, and the wines have been in demand for centuries. During the 18th century King Louis XIV’s physician recommended that for his health the king only drink wines from Nuits-Saint-Georges. Like most of Burgundy, the soils of the Côte de Nuit can vary greatly from one vineyard to another, though most are a base soil of limestone mixed with clay, gravel and sand.

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir, AOC (AC)

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.