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2019 Domaine Ponsot Bourgogne Cuvee Du Pinson

ITEM 8307962 - Removed from a professional wine storage facility; Purchased upon release

Front Item Photo

PRODUCER

Domaine Ponsot

Domaine Ponsot was founded in 1872 when William Ponsot returned from the Franco-Prussian war and bought an estate in Morey-Saint-Denis on the Cote de Nuit, in Burgundy. The Ponsots began bottling estate wine in 1934, much earlier than most Burgundy producers, and today the estate is still owned and operated by the Ponsot family. Laurent Ponsot has been in charge since 1983 and the estate now includes some 27 acres. Clive Coates has called it “one of the most individual domaines in Burgundy” because of late picking, the practice of retaining up to 25% stems, fermenting at high temperatures and using new oak, among other policies. The estate makes highly regarded premier cru and village wines. Of special note is a premier cru blanc made, in recent years, entirely of Aligote. Older vintages include 20 - 30% Chardonnay.

REGION

France, Burgundy

Burgundy in eastern France is, if not the most famous and storied wine region in the world, certainly one of the top two or three. Its winemaking history dates from the Roman era, and its relatively small size and reputation for outstanding wines means that the best wines of Burgundy are generally among the world’s most prized – and costly – wines. At about 110,000 vineyards acres, Burgundy is only 40% as big as Bordeaux, and its system of dividing up vineyards into small, family-owned parcels makes understanding the wines of Burgundy a life-long pursuit for Burgundy enthusiasts. The three main grapes of Burgundy are Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Gamay. Burgundy is a long, narrow, north-south running region consisting of five main areas. They are Chablis in the north, Côte D’Or, Côte Chalonnaise, Mâconnais and Beaujolais, which is just above the Rhone Valley. Pinot Noir and Chardonnay are grown throughout most of Burgundy but Gamay is grown primarily in Beaujolais. The appellation system and rules about labeling can be confusing and the system classifies regions, villages and even individual vineyards. Grand Cru is the most prestigious appellation category, followed by Premier Cru and many village and regional appellations.