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2000, 2014, 2016-2018 Bordeaux Mixed

6-bottle Mixed Lot

ITEM 8243994 - Removed from a temperature and humidity controlled wine storage unit; Purchased at retail

Bidder Amount Total
$1,075
Front Item Photo
Front Item Photo

2000 Château Bel Air-Marquis D'Aligre

RATINGS

93Vinous / IWC

There are moss-like, undergrowth scents, a touch of morels...the nose blossoms and finds its groove...The palate is medium-bodied with fine tannin... Towards the finish there are subtle notes of tobacco and terracotta that lend another layer of complexity.

17Jancis Robinson

Pure fermented grape juice plus gypsy cream biscuits. A little dry on the end but with a completely different structure...

REGION

France, Bordeaux, Margaux

Margaux is one of Bordeaux’s most famous appellations and also one of its largest, with about 3,400 acres of vineyards. Located on the Left Bank of the Gironde River, Margaux has the greatest number of classified-growth châteaux (or crus classé) according to the 1855 classification. There are twenty-one crus classé, including the most famous estate, the first growth Château Margaux. The Margaux appellation includes vineyards around the village of Margaux and the villages of Arsac, Cantenac, d’Issan, Labarde and Soussans. Wines from the best Margaux châteaux and vintages are prized for their perfumey fragrance and elegant, silky mouthfeel. Margaux wines are predominately Cabernet Sauvignon blended with Merlot, Petit Verdot and Cabernet Franc.
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2017 Château Beychevelle

RATINGS

95Vinous / IWC

...luscious, extroverted beauty. An exotic mélange of super-ripe dark cherry, red plum, pomegranate, espresso, licorice and blood orange...

95Wine Enthusiast

The integration of the tannins and the powerful fruits is exemplary, bringing out a stylish wine that finishes with blackberry fruits.

95Jeb Dunnuck

Lively, elegant notes of green tobacco, lead pencil, flowers, mint, and blueberries...medium to full-bodied, with a classic, elegant texture, ripe tannins, and a great finish.

94+ The Wine Advocate

...fragrant, floral nose with warm cassis, preserved plums and Morello cherries plus earth, herbs and cinnamon touches. Medium-bodied, it has lovely expression with firm, fine grained tannins and seamless freshness, finishing long and mineral laced.

93James Suckling

Aromas of flowers, berries and light cedar with some milk-chocolate undertones. Medium body. Creamy tannins and a firm, caressing finish. Shows tension and focus.

16.5Jancis Robinson

Very floral and fragrant fruit. High toned. Succulent entry, quite polished and fleshy. Full array of fruit and fresh, vibrant acidity. The tannins are fine...excellent structure against the fruit.

PRODUCER

Château Beychevelle

Château Beychevelle is a Fourth Growth estate according to the Bordeaux classification of 1855. Located in the St.- Julian appellation, the estate’s history dates back to the Middle Ages, when its wine was shipped to England and Germany. After a succession of owners over the centuries, the estate today is owned by an international business conglomerate, Grands Millesimes de France. There are 192.7 acres in the St.-Julien appellation, and the vineyards are planted to 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 28% Merlot, 8% Cabernet Franc and 4% Petit Verdot. About 300,000 bottles are produced annually. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that “Beychevelle wines are generally soft and smooth, and accessible in their youth."

REGION

France, Bordeaux, St.-Julien

Saint-Julien is the smallest of the four main Médoc appellations with 2,175 acres of vineyards. It is just south of Pauillac on the left bank of the Gironde, and although it has no First Growth châteaux, its 11 Classified Growth estates are widely admired. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that winemaking in Saint-Julien from all classifications “is consistently both distinctive and brilliant.” He adds it is Médoc’s “most underrated commune.” The best-known estates are Léoville Las Cases, Ducru-Beaucaillou, Léoville Poyferré, Léoville Barton and Gruaud Larose, and most of those have riverside estates. The soil in this appellation is gravelly with clay. Cabernet Sauvignon is the main grape grown, and it is blended with Cabernet Franc, Merlot and sometimes small amounts of Petit Verdot.
Front Item Photo

2018 Château Beychevelle

RATINGS

96Jeb Dunnuck

...classic Saint-Julien purity of fruit as well as a wealth of fruit. Gorgeous notes of crème de cassis, chocolate-covered blueberries, violets, spring flowers, tobacco leaf, and cedar notes all emerge from the glass, and it's medium to full-bodied, with sweet tannins, moderate acidity, and a great, great finish.

95The Wine Advocate

...classic notes of cassis, plum preserves and ripe blackberries, with emerging suggestions of unsmoked cigars, tilled soil and cedar chest, plus a waft of pencil lead...medium to full-bodied palate...finely packed black fruit and earthy layers within a frame of firm, grainy tannins and just enough freshness, finishing long and mineral laced.

95Wine Spectator

Violet and warm cassis aromas and flavors lead the way, melding with applewood, ganache, açaí and blueberry reduction notes along the way. Almost lush in the end, but there's a buried tarry streak giving it just a bit of grippy texture for contrast. Serious juice.

95Wine Enthusiast

...smooth textured, ripe wine that is packed with a black fruit flavor and bold tannins...well-integrated structure and density of fruit flavors...

94James Suckling

Currants and blackberries with crushed stone and fresh herbs...flower stem...full-bodied...firm, driven tannins.

92Vinous / IWC

...fresh, fragrant nose with plenty of blackberry, gravel, mint and incense aromas...very well defined. The palate is medium-bodied with a crisp entry and plenty of sappy black fruit...

16.5Jancis Robinson

Pure, attractive cassis on the nose. The palate is smooth with remarkably resolved tannins...hints of nutmeg...seductive and soft wine...

PRODUCER

Château Beychevelle

Château Beychevelle is a Fourth Growth estate according to the Bordeaux classification of 1855. Located in the St.- Julian appellation, the estate’s history dates back to the Middle Ages, when its wine was shipped to England and Germany. After a succession of owners over the centuries, the estate today is owned by an international business conglomerate, Grands Millesimes de France. There are 192.7 acres in the St.-Julien appellation, and the vineyards are planted to 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 28% Merlot, 8% Cabernet Franc and 4% Petit Verdot. About 300,000 bottles are produced annually. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that “Beychevelle wines are generally soft and smooth, and accessible in their youth."

REGION

France, Bordeaux, St.-Julien

Saint-Julien is the smallest of the four main Médoc appellations with 2,175 acres of vineyards. It is just south of Pauillac on the left bank of the Gironde, and although it has no First Growth châteaux, its 11 Classified Growth estates are widely admired. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that winemaking in Saint-Julien from all classifications “is consistently both distinctive and brilliant.” He adds it is Médoc’s “most underrated commune.” The best-known estates are Léoville Las Cases, Ducru-Beaucaillou, Léoville Poyferré, Léoville Barton and Gruaud Larose, and most of those have riverside estates. The soil in this appellation is gravelly with clay. Cabernet Sauvignon is the main grape grown, and it is blended with Cabernet Franc, Merlot and sometimes small amounts of Petit Verdot.
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2014 Château Ducru-Beaucaillou

RATINGS

96The Wine Advocate

The palate is very well defined with fine tannin, pitch-perfect acidity, a palpable sense of energy and frisson from start to finish that delivers plenty of tobacco-infused fruit.

96Jeb Dunnuck

...elegance and power in its crème de cassis, raspberries, cedarwood, graphite, and floral bouquet, with its background oak smothered in fruit.

95Wine Spectator

This is opulent, with layers of warmed fig, boysenberry and blackberry confiture that loll along, yet are kept going by a graphite note that is well-buried throughout.

95Vinous / IWC

A blast of dark cherry, crème de cassis, mocha, spice and chocolate makes a strong opening statement. Super-ripe, voluptuous and opulent, the wine possesses off-the-charts depth and richness.

17Jancis Robinson

PRODUCER

Château Ducru-Beaucaillou

Château Ducru-Beaucaillou is a Second-Growth estate in the St.-Julien appellation. The estate’s history goes back centuries, and five families have owned and operated it over many generations. Today the 128-acre estate is owned by the Borie family, who purchased it in 1941. The family also owns Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste and Château Haut-Batailley. Ducru-Beaucaillou means “beautiful stones,” and the estate was named after the impressive, large stones in the region. Vineyards are planted to 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Merlot and 5% Cabernet Franc. About 220,000 bottles are produced annually. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that “the wine of Ducru-Beaucaillou is the essence of elegance, symmetry, balance, breed, class and distinction.”

REGION

France, Bordeaux, St.-Julien

Saint-Julien is the smallest of the four main Médoc appellations with 2,175 acres of vineyards. It is just south of Pauillac on the left bank of the Gironde, and although it has no First Growth châteaux, its 11 Classified Growth estates are widely admired. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that winemaking in Saint-Julien from all classifications “is consistently both distinctive and brilliant.” He adds it is Médoc’s “most underrated commune.” The best-known estates are Léoville Las Cases, Ducru-Beaucaillou, Léoville Poyferré, Léoville Barton and Gruaud Larose, and most of those have riverside estates. The soil in this appellation is gravelly with clay. Cabernet Sauvignon is the main grape grown, and it is blended with Cabernet Franc, Merlot and sometimes small amounts of Petit Verdot.
Front Item Photo

2016 Château Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande

RATINGS

100Jeb Dunnuck

Perfect balance and thrilling intensity as well as heavenly aromatics of crème de cassis, leafy herbs, jammy blackberries, tobacco leaf.... Possessing a deep, full-bodied, singular character, the purity of fruit that's the hallmark of the vintage

98+ The Wine Advocate

A core of crushed blackcurrants, blueberry compote and black raspberries with nuances of cinnamon stick, violets, star anise...Medium-bodied and super intense in the mouth, the palate bursts with black fruits and savory layers

97Wine Spectator

Saturated with dark currant, fig and blackberry compote flavors, this has a fleshy, nearly glycerin feel at first before stretching out to reveal singed cedar, tobacco leaf, dark earth and cassis bush flavors.

#97 of 2019Wine Spectator Top 100

PRODUCER

Château Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande

Château Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande has roots in the late 17th century, when Pierre de Mazure de Rauzan bought property near Pauillac, in Medoc. When his daughter married Jacques de Pichon Longueville, the estate of Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande was established. The estate remained with the family until 1925, when it was purchased by the Miailhe family. In 2007 it was sold to the Rouzaud family, who are owners of the Louis Roederer Champagne house. Collectors prize Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande as one of the Pauillac’s most consistently excellent wines. The wine traditionally has a high proportion of Merlot, usually about 35%, which gives it a characteristic velvety and supple aspect. The estate includes 183 acres planted to 45% Cabernet Sauvignon, 35% Merlot, 12% Cabernet Franc and 8% Petit Verdot. The average age of the vines is 40 years, and 180,000 bottles of Château Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande are produced annually.

REGION

France, Bordeaux, Pauillac

Pauillac is Bordeaux’s most famous appellation, thanks to the fact that it is home to three of the region’s fabled first-growth châteaux, Lafite-Rothschild, Mouton-Rothschild and Latour. Perched on the left bank of the Gironde River north of the city of Bordeaux, Pauillac is centered around the commune of Pauillac and includes about 3,000 acres of vineyards. The Bordeaux classification of 1855 named 18 classified growths, including the three above mentioned First Growths. Cabernet Sauvignon is the principal grape grown, followed by Merlot. The soil is mostly sandy gravel mixed with marl and iron. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that “the textbook Pauillac would tend to have a rich, full-bodied texture, a distinctive bouquet of black currants, licorice and cedary scents, and excellent aging potential.”
Front Item Photo

2018 Château Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande

RATINGS

98Wine Enthusiast

Packed blackberry fruits, laced with acidity, are just starting out on a long journey along with the tannins. The wine's elegance is beautifully preserved within the structure.

98+ Jeb Dunnuck

...notes of blackcurrants, crushed stone, scorched earth, lead pencil shavings, and tobacco leaf...full-bodied, concentrated, and powerful on the palate, with masses of tannins, beautiful mid-palate density, and a great finish.

97+ The Wine Advocate

...scents of baked plums, ripe blackcurrants and wild blueberries, followed by hints of cedar chest, pencil lead, bouquet garni and charcuterie, plus a waft of lilacs. The medium-bodied palate is beautifully crafted with its seamless freshness and firm, grainy tannins supporting the compelling, finely knit black fruits and savory nuances, finishing on a lingering fragrant-earth note.

97+ Vinous / IWC

A heady concoction of inky dark fruit, graphite, new leather, licorice, lavender, spice and grilled herbs...rich and expansive yet retains a super-classic vertical feel. Plush, silky tannins add to its immeasurable pedigree.

97James Suckling

Aromas of blackberry, dried blueberry, gravel, mocha and cigar box. Light fresh-herb undertone. It’s full-bodied with firm, ultra fine tannins and fresh acidity. Focused and minerally with a long finish. Great length.

18Jancis Robinson

Complex fruit on the nose, both ripe cassis but also more floral and lifted fruit and a hint of white pepper. The structure and depth of Cabernet Sauvignon drives the palate with fresh black fruits and bold but ripe tannins.

#2 of 2021Wine Spectator Top 100

Offers a deep well of dark currant, blackberry paste and plum preserves fruit that needs time to unwind fully, as it’s shrouded in warm earth, tobacco, singed cedar, sweet bay leaf and savory notes.

PRODUCER

Château Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande

Château Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande has roots in the late 17th century, when Pierre de Mazure de Rauzan bought property near Pauillac, in Medoc. When his daughter married Jacques de Pichon Longueville, the estate of Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande was established. The estate remained with the family until 1925, when it was purchased by the Miailhe family. In 2007 it was sold to the Rouzaud family, who are owners of the Louis Roederer Champagne house. Collectors prize Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande as one of the Pauillac’s most consistently excellent wines. The wine traditionally has a high proportion of Merlot, usually about 35%, which gives it a characteristic velvety and supple aspect. The estate includes 183 acres planted to 45% Cabernet Sauvignon, 35% Merlot, 12% Cabernet Franc and 8% Petit Verdot. The average age of the vines is 40 years, and 180,000 bottles of Château Pichon-Longueville-Comtesse-de-Lalande are produced annually.

REGION

France, Bordeaux, Pauillac

Pauillac is Bordeaux’s most famous appellation, thanks to the fact that it is home to three of the region’s fabled first-growth châteaux, Lafite-Rothschild, Mouton-Rothschild and Latour. Perched on the left bank of the Gironde River north of the city of Bordeaux, Pauillac is centered around the commune of Pauillac and includes about 3,000 acres of vineyards. The Bordeaux classification of 1855 named 18 classified growths, including the three above mentioned First Growths. Cabernet Sauvignon is the principal grape grown, followed by Merlot. The soil is mostly sandy gravel mixed with marl and iron. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that “the textbook Pauillac would tend to have a rich, full-bodied texture, a distinctive bouquet of black currants, licorice and cedary scents, and excellent aging potential.”