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2002 Duclot Case Collection

9-bottle Horizontal, Wood Case

See item details for bottle notes; Light case condition issue

France Direct
Expected Arrival:
July, 2022
France Direct wines are sourced from individual cellars in France. They ship directly to our Napa warehouse each quarter.

ITEM 8094155 - Purchased upon release; Removed from a temperature controlled subterranean wine cellar

Bidder Amount Total
sarma24 $10,000 $10,000
$10,000
Item Sold Amount Date
I8094155 1 $10,000 Jan 23, 2022
Front Item Photo
Front Item Photo

2002 Château Ausone

RATINGS

95Robert M. Parker Jr.

When the wine hits the palate, it exhibits impressive purity, medium to full body, a multi-layered texture, and extraordinary precision and intensity with a finish just short of 50 seconds.

93+ Stephen Tanzer

...Explosive aromas of blackberry, minerals, violet, espresso & bitter chocolate. Fine-grained & pliant but with terrific precision of flavor and grip. Finishes juicy & very long, with substantial dusty tannins and excellent life and lift..

92Wine Spectator

Beautiful blackberry and decadent aromas of meat and earth. Full-bodied, with velvety tannins and a rich, long finish. Should develop really nicely in the bottle...

PRODUCER

Château Ausone

Château Ausone is one of the Premier Grand Crus Classe A of St.-Emilion, which means it is considered one of the finest wines of the right bank according to the region’s historic classification system. Legend has it that the estate’s name is derived from the name of the 4th century Roman poet Ausonius, who lived in the area and maintained a vineyard. But the château itself notes that the link may be more fanciful than fact. Nevertheless the estate, which includes a mere 17.3 acres of vineyards, has long enjoyed one of the best locations in all of Bordeaux on a steep southwestern slope a few meters from the medieval town of St.-Emilion. The estate makes a fraction of the wine made by many of its larger neighbors. The estate makes 20,000 to 30,000 bottles annually of its Chateau Ausone Premier Grand Cru, and about 7,000 bottles of its second line, Chapelle d’Ausone. The vineyards are planted in 50% Merlot and 50% Cabernet Franc. The average age of the vines is 50-55 years.

REGION

France, Bordeaux, St.-Émilion

Saint-Émilion is on the east side of the Dordogne River. At 13,400 acres it is one of Bordeaux’s largest appellations, and perhaps its most picturesque. It is also home to what has been called “the garagiste” movement of upstart, tradition-defying winemakers who produce artisanal wines in styles that are unconventional for the appellation. The village of Saint-Émilion dates from the middle ages and it sits on low hills, surrounded by ancient walls. Like its neighbor Pomerol, Saint-Émilion was not included in the famous Bordeaux classification system of 1855. But a century later a ranking system was put in place, and unlike the classification system for the Medoc, the Saint-Émilion system is reviewed every ten years, meaning that estates can be upgraded or downgraded. There are three rankings: Grand Cru Classé, Premier Grand Cru Classé B and Premier Grand Cru Classé A, with the final ranking being the best. Such legendary Saint-Émilion estates as Châteaux Ausone and Cheval-Blanc are Premier Grand Cru Classé A, along with Châteaux Pavie and Angélus, both added to the classification in 2012. Wines in this appellation are primarily Merlot, mixed with Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon.
Front Item Photo

2002 Château Cheval-Blanc

RATINGS

92Wine Spectator

Fantastic aromas of black licorice and sweet tobacco change to raspberries and follow through to a full-bodied palate, with lovely silky tannins and a long, caressing finish. Multilayered. A beauty.

91+ Stephen Tanzer

...Silky and nicely concentrated, with strong minerality and lively acidity framing the flavors. Not a hugely ripe or opulent Cheval, but understated and classy. Finishes with rather suave tannins and a whiplash of flavor.

90Robert M. Parker Jr.

Possessing sweet tannin, medium body, and undeniable elegance as well as nobility...

17.5Jancis Robinson

Solid, savoury, quite demanding quality. Readable and good and long.

PRODUCER

Château Cheval-Blanc

Château Cheval Blanc is a Premier Grand Cru Classe A of St.-Emilion. Cheval Blanc won medals at prestigious international exhibitions in London and Paris in the mid-19th century and those medals are still depicted on Cheval Blanc bottle labels. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that among the most famous wines of Bordeaux, “Cheval Blanc probably has the broadest window of drinkability. It is usually delicious when first bottled, yet it has the ability in the top years to gain weight and last.” Parker also notes that Cheval Blanc typically includes more Cabernet Franc than other Bordeaux, another possible key to its unique style. Located in St.-Emilion, the château includes 91.4 acres of vineyards planted in 58% Cabernet Franc and 42 % Merlot. The average age of the vines is 45 years. Some 100,000 bottles of Château Cheval Blanc are produced each year. The Managing Director of the estate is Pierre Lurton, a distinguished winemaker and estate director who also is President and CEO of Château d'Yquem.

REGION

France, Bordeaux, St.-Émilion

Saint-Émilion is on the east side of the Dordogne River. At 13,400 acres it is one of Bordeaux’s largest appellations, and perhaps its most picturesque. It is also home to what has been called “the garagiste” movement of upstart, tradition-defying winemakers who produce artisanal wines in styles that are unconventional for the appellation. The village of Saint-Émilion dates from the middle ages and it sits on low hills, surrounded by ancient walls. Like its neighbor Pomerol, Saint-Émilion was not included in the famous Bordeaux classification system of 1855. But a century later a ranking system was put in place, and unlike the classification system for the Medoc, the Saint-Émilion system is reviewed every ten years, meaning that estates can be upgraded or downgraded. There are three rankings: Grand Cru Classé, Premier Grand Cru Classé B and Premier Grand Cru Classé A, with the final ranking being the best. Such legendary Saint-Émilion estates as Châteaux Ausone and Cheval-Blanc are Premier Grand Cru Classé A, along with Châteaux Pavie and Angélus, both added to the classification in 2012. Wines in this appellation are primarily Merlot, mixed with Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon.

2002 Château Haut-Brion

Light label condition issue

RATINGS

93Wine Spectator

Complex aromas of blackberries, tobacco and cedar follow through to a full-bodied palate, with ripe, velvety tannins and a long, caressing finish. Very beautiful.

92+ Stephen Tanzer

...Suave and light on its feet, with excellent integrated acidity framing and extending the flavors. Classy and classic wine, finishing with ripe, building tannins. This would be perfect with a cigar...

17.5+ Jancis Robinson

Round and heady and easy, real depth and interest. Juicy. Very long

PRODUCER

Château Haut-Brion

As one of the four original First Growth Bordeaux, Château Haut-Brion enjoys an illustrious history and has long been considered one of the jewels of French winemaking. Founded in the 16th century in Pessac, the founding family’s early winemakers employed such modern techniques as topping up vines and racking casks. The resulting wines were widely admired and were bought as investments as early as the late 1700s. Francophile Thomas Jefferson served Château Haut-Brion at The White House after he became president and the practice was continued by several of his successors. The château cultivates 106.7 acres given over to 45% Cabernet Sauvignon, 37% Merlot, and 18% Cabernet Franc. The average age of the vines is 36 years and annual production is about 7,800 bottles of Château Haut-Brion and 88,000 bottles of the second line, Le Clarence de Haut-Brion, formerly known as Château Bahans Haut-Brion.

REGION

France, Bordeaux, Graves

Graves is on the left bank of the Garonne River south of the city of Bordeaux. The appellation takes its name from its soil, which is intensely gravelly thanks to glaciers that melted in the area a few million years ago. Graves is generally thought of as the birthplace of Bordeaux wines, since “claret,” as the English historically called Bordeaux reds, were being produced for export in Graves and shipped to England as early as the 12th century. Some Graves châteaux, including Haut-Brion, trace their history to the late 16th century and Thomas Jefferson was one of several notable wine connoisseurs who wrote admiringly about the wines of Château Haut-Brion. Haut-Brion’s popularity with international celebrities is perhaps why it was the only non-Médoc château to be included in the 1855 Bordeaux classification. Graves makes red and white wines. The reds are predominantly Cabernet Sauvignon, blended with Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot and Malbec. The whites are made of Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon and Muscadelle. The Graves AOC includes nearly 8,000 acres of vineyards. In 1953 a Graves classification was created for red wines, and in 1959 white wines were added.

2002 Château La Mission Haut Brion

Light label condition issue

RATINGS

91Wine Spectator

Bright aromas of blackberries, cherries, currants and toasted oak follow through to a full-bodied palate, with chewy tannins. Long and silky.

91+ Stephen Tanzer

Sexy aromas of black raspberry, smoked meat and warm stones. Dry, classic and deep...Finishes very long, with substantial dusty tannins and brisk acids.

PRODUCER

Château La Mission Haut Brion

Château La Mission Haut-Brion, a Classified Red Wine of Graves, has one of the most intriguing histories in Bordeaux. Wine was produced on the estate, located in Talence, in the early 16th century by the de Roustaing family. In 1682 the estate was bequeathed to an order of Catholic friars who not only built an architecturally significant chapel, which is today part of the estate, but who became excellent viticulturalists. In the early 19th century the estate was bought by a native of New Orleans of French descent who wanted to retire in Bordeaux. By the early 20th century the estate’s wines were considered so fine that they sold for more than the wines Châteaux Margaux and Latour. The estate continued to be well-managed, and after several changes in ownership it now belongs to the Dillon family, which also owns Château Haut-Brion. La Mission owns 51.6 acres of vineyards planted to 45% Merlot, 48% Cabernet Sauvignon and 7% Cabernet Franc.

REGION

France, Bordeaux, Graves, Pessac-Léognan

Pessac-Léognan was created in 1987 from the northern part of the left bank Graves appellation. Before then it was simply part of Graves, or sometimes it was called Haut-Graves. Unlike many other Bordeaux appellations, Pessac-Léognan is known for both red and dry white wines, although its reds are more famous. The appellation includes ten communes and the area’s most important châteaux, including Château Haut-Brion, the only non-Médoc estate included in the 1855 Bordeaux classification. There are 2,964 acres of vineyards in Pessac-Léognan and 16 classified growth estates. The main red grapes grown are Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, along with a small amount of Cabernet Franc. White grapes grown are Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon, with a little Muscadelle. Pessac-Léognan is considered to have the best terroir of the greater Graves region.

2002 Château Lafite-Rothschild

Label condition issue

RATINGS

95Wine Spectator

Bubbling over with crushed berries, currants and spices, with tobacco notes. Beautiful. Full bodied, with gorgeously velvety tannins and a long finish of pretty fruit.

94Robert M. Parker Jr.

Wonderfully pure, dense, with a deep ruby/purple color and loads of fruit, definition, and a long finish...

92+ Stephen Tanzer

...Extremely suave, fine-grained and concentrated, with a strong spine of acidity. Finishes firmly tannic, subtle and very long. This should develop slowly.

17.5Jancis Robinson

...Racy with green-apples character and admirably long. This still seems to have been the most successful Pauillac first growth in this uncharming vintage...

PRODUCER

Château Lafite-Rothschild

As one of the original four First Growth Bordeaux estates designated by the historic 1855 Bordeaux classification, Château Lafite-Rothschild wines remain some of the world’s most prestigious. One of the château's earliest and most celebrated fans was King Louis XV, who reportedly preferred to buy Château Lafite-Rothschild wine above all other wines. The winery’s reputation remains intact as one of the world’s leading Bordeaux producers. Located in Pauillac, one of Bordeaux’s four famous left bank communes, Château Lafite-Rothschild began gaining a reputation as a great winemaking estate in the 17th century after the vines were first planted on the estate in the late 1670s by Jacques de Ségur. The history of the château is deeply rooted in French winemaking lineage. Jacques de Ségur’s son Alexandre married the heiress of Château Latour and together they had a son, Nicolas-Alexandre de Ségur, linking the histories of both Lafite and Latour from the beginning of each estate’s founding. In the early 18th century, Bordeaux blends were wildly popular in London (known to British wine drinkers as “French clarets,” coining the term Bordeaux-style red wine blends still used today) with the prime minister Robert Walpole drinking a barrel of Lafite every three months. The château survived many significant periods in French history relatively unscathed and was eventually purchased in 1868 by Baron James de Rothschild. The estate has remained in the hands of the Rothschild family ever since. The term “lafite” is derived from “la hite,” or little hill in one of the regional dialects used in France in the Middle Ages. The domaines Baron de Rothschild also include Château Rieussec, Château L’Evangile, Château Duhart-Milon, and others in France and Argentina. Château Lafite-Rothschild includes 247.1 acres of vineyards planted in 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Merlot, 3% Cabernet Franc, and 2% Petit Verdot. The average age of the vines is 40 years. Annual production is 18,000 to 25,

REGION

France, Bordeaux, Pauillac

Pauillac is Bordeaux’s most famous appellation, thanks to the fact that it is home to three of the region’s fabled first-growth châteaux, Lafite-Rothschild, Mouton-Rothschild and Latour. Perched on the left bank of the Gironde River north of the city of Bordeaux, Pauillac is centered around the commune of Pauillac and includes about 3,000 acres of vineyards. The Bordeaux classification of 1855 named 18 classified growths, including the three above mentioned First Growths. Cabernet Sauvignon is the principal grape grown, followed by Merlot. The soil is mostly sandy gravel mixed with marl and iron. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that “the textbook Pauillac would tend to have a rich, full-bodied texture, a distinctive bouquet of black currants, licorice and cedary scents, and excellent aging potential.”
Front Item Photo

2002 Château Latour

RATINGS

96Robert M. Parker Jr.

..notes of English walnuts, crushed rocks, black currants, and forest floor, dense, full-bodied, and opulent, yet classic with spectacular aromatics, marvelous purity, and a full-bodied finish that lasts just over 50+ seconds.

96Wine Spectator

Loads of ripe currants, licorice and toasted oak on the nose. Subtle yet impressive. Full-bodied, with a solid core of ripe fruit and chewy tannins. Big and juicy.

94+ Stephen Tanzer

...Sweet, fleshy and dense, with an impeccable sugar/acid balance. Strong mineral tones and firm acids. Finishes long and gripping, with excellent tannic spine and lift...

#20 of 2005Wine Spectator Top 100

PRODUCER

Château Latour

Château Latour’s long and noble history is summarized graphically on every bottle. The label shows the domaine’s famous tower, a symbol of the château's importance to regional politics and defense as early as the 14th century. And as one of the original four First Growth Bordeaux, the estate has become even more significant in the last 200 years as the producer of one of the world’s most legendary wines. Robert M. Parker Jr. has noted that the wine produced at Château Latour “has been an impeccable model of consistent excellence in great, mediocre and poor vintages.” After passing to British ownership from 1963 to 1993, the château was purchased in 1993 by Francois Pinault, one of France’s most successful businessmen and entrepreneurs. Vineyards total 163 acres, with 75% planted to Cabernet Sauvignon, 4% to Cabernet Franc, 20% to Merlot, and 1% Petit Verdot. The average age of the vines is 60 years. The chateau produces 180,000 bottles of Château Latour annually.

REGION

France, Bordeaux, Pauillac

Pauillac is Bordeaux’s most famous appellation, thanks to the fact that it is home to three of the region’s fabled first-growth châteaux, Lafite-Rothschild, Mouton-Rothschild and Latour. Perched on the left bank of the Gironde River north of the city of Bordeaux, Pauillac is centered around the commune of Pauillac and includes about 3,000 acres of vineyards. The Bordeaux classification of 1855 named 18 classified growths, including the three above mentioned First Growths. Cabernet Sauvignon is the principal grape grown, followed by Merlot. The soil is mostly sandy gravel mixed with marl and iron. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that “the textbook Pauillac would tend to have a rich, full-bodied texture, a distinctive bouquet of black currants, licorice and cedary scents, and excellent aging potential.”

2002 Château Margaux

Light label condition issue

RATINGS

93Robert M. Parker Jr.

It has a beautifully elegant nose of black fruits intermixed with truffle, flower, and oak. The wine is medium to full-bodied, dense, with wonderful precision, freshness, and a long, full-bodied finish...

92Wine Spectator

Full-bodied, with silky tannins and pretty fruit. Needs a bit more fruit on the midpalate to be a classic Margaux, but clearly outstanding.

92+ Stephen Tanzer

...Classic aromas of boysenberry, black cherry, minerals and lead pencil. Then juicy and penetrating, with cabernet-dominated berry and mineral flavors...Finishes with very firm, youthfully tough tannins...

17Jancis Robinson

Sweet and easy and round and digestible. Racy, with a very neat finish

PRODUCER

Château Margaux

Château Margaux is one of the world’s most famous wine producers, and with good reason. The estate’s history dates to the 12th century, and by the 16th century its owners were rotating vineyards into their grain fields. Its wines were being exported by the early 18th century and they quickly became Bordeaux’s gold standard for quality. Thomas Jefferson, when he was ambassador to France, was especially fond of Château Margaux and noted approvingly that “there cannot be a better bottle of Bordeaux.” As one of the First Growth Chateaux – one of the four recognized as outstanding in France’s historic 1855 Bordeaux classification – Margaux has always been one of the aristocrats of the Medoc. Château Margaux’s 193 acres of vineyards yields an annual average of 200,000 bottles of Château Margaux and 200,000 bottles of Pavillon Rouge Château Margaux, its secondary line. Grape varietals grown at the chateau are 75% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Merlot, 5% Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot.

REGION

France, Bordeaux, Margaux

Margaux is one of Bordeaux’s most famous appellations and also one of its largest, with about 3,400 acres of vineyards. Located on the Left Bank of the Gironde River, Margaux has the greatest number of classified-growth châteaux (or crus classé) according to the 1855 classification. There are twenty-one crus classé, including the most famous estate, the first growth Château Margaux. The Margaux appellation includes vineyards around the village of Margaux and the villages of Arsac, Cantenac, d’Issan, Labarde and Soussans. Wines from the best Margaux châteaux and vintages are prized for their perfumey fragrance and elegant, silky mouthfeel. Margaux wines are predominately Cabernet Sauvignon blended with Merlot, Petit Verdot and Cabernet Franc.

2002 Château Mouton Rothschild

Light capsule condition issue; label condition issue

RATINGS

94Stephen Tanzer

Tight nose hints at currant and smoky oak. Highly concentrated, densely packed & built to age...also shows a lovely velvety texture rare for this vintage..

93Robert M. Parker Jr.

...exhibits the classic cassis aroma that is so characteristic of Mouton. Medium to full-bodied, tannic, powerful, and cut somewhat from the 1988 mold, this is a backward, chewy, well-endowed Mouton...

91Wine Spectator

Complex aromas of tobacco, cedar, berry and currants. Full-bodied, with a solid core of fruit and ripe tannins.

17.5Jancis Robinson

...Real interest and life and savour - this wine sparkles with life. Well balanced and with layers..

PRODUCER

Château Mouton Rothschild

Chateau Mouton Rothschild is legendary estate. It was purchased in 1853 by Baron Nathaniel de Rothschild and in 1924 his successors became the first Bordeaux vignerons to introduce estate bottling. Although the chateau was not selected as one of the four First Growth Chateaux in the historic 1855 classification, Mouton Rothschild was elevated from a second growth to first growth in 1973, the only chateau ever to be moved from the second to first classification. The Rothschild talent for marketing and innovation also resulted in the wine industry’s first high-profile label design program. Since 1945 the chateau has each year commissioned a famous artist to design the label. The list of contributors includes Salvador Dali, Joan Miro, Pablo Picasso and Andy Warhol. In Pauillac Mouton has 205 acres under cultivation, which includes 77% Cabernet Sauvignon, 12% Merlot, 9% Cabernet Franc and 2% Petit Verdot. On average the vines are nearly 50 years old. Annual production is 300,000 bottles of Chateau Mouton Rothschild.

REGION

France, Bordeaux, Pauillac

Pauillac is Bordeaux’s most famous appellation, thanks to the fact that it is home to three of the region’s fabled first-growth châteaux, Lafite-Rothschild, Mouton-Rothschild and Latour. Perched on the left bank of the Gironde River north of the city of Bordeaux, Pauillac is centered around the commune of Pauillac and includes about 3,000 acres of vineyards. The Bordeaux classification of 1855 named 18 classified growths, including the three above mentioned First Growths. Cabernet Sauvignon is the principal grape grown, followed by Merlot. The soil is mostly sandy gravel mixed with marl and iron. Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that “the textbook Pauillac would tend to have a rich, full-bodied texture, a distinctive bouquet of black currants, licorice and cedary scents, and excellent aging potential.”

2002 Petrus

Light label condition issue

RATINGS

93Wine Spectator

Gorgeous subtle aromas of crushed raspberries and light vanilla, with hints of spices. Medium- to full-bodied, with wonderfully seductive, silky tannins. Beautiful slinky finish. Pétrus is very fine indeed in this vintage. Not overdone,..

92Stephen Tanzer

...Densely packed and round but cool, with rich, full red fruit flavors spreading out to saturate the entire mouth. Just a hint of austerity to remind the taster of the vintage. Finishes with excellent length for 2002...

90Robert M. Parker Jr.

...notes of plums, black cherries, licorice, and some herbs and damp earth. Medium-bodied, muscular, and tannic...

18Jancis Robinson

Very rich and long and gorgeous. Spicy and long - really gorgeous. OK, a bit inky, but with such energy!...

PRODUCER

Petrus

Although there is no official classification of the Pomerol, Petrus – located in the Pomerol appellation on the right bank of the Gironde River -- is nevertheless one of the most sought-after wines in the world. Because there is no physical château on the property, the wine is often called simply Petrus. The wine’s fame began in the 1940s, when several Petrus vintages won international acclaim. Since 2010 Petrus has been made nearly entirely of Merlot, though previous vintages included tiny amounts of Cabernet Franc. Owned since 1961 by the Moueix family, the estate’s small size means that very little wine is produced, which adds to the wine’s prestige and mystique. The estate’s vineyard management has also become highly disciplined in the relatively modern practice of vendage verte, the thinning out of young grapes to encourage better ripening in those that remain. Petrus includes 28.4 acres of vineyards. The vines are 35 years old on average an annual production is 25,000 to 30,000 bottles.

REGION

France, Bordeaux, Pomerol

Pomerol is the smallest of Bordeaux’s red wine producing regions, with only about 2,000 acres of vineyards. Located on the east side of the Dordogne River, it is one of the so-called “right bank” appellations and therefore planted primarily to Merlot. Pomerol is unique in Bordeaux in that it is the only district never to have been rated in a classification system. Some historians think Pomerol’s location on the right bank made it unattractive to Bordeaux-based wine traders, who had plenty of wine from Medoc and Graves to export to England and northern Europe. Since ranking estates was essentially a marketing ploy to help brokers sell wine, ranking an area where they did little business held no interest for them. Pomerol didn’t get much attention from the international wine community until the 1960s, when Jean-Pierre Moueix, an entrepreneurial wine merchant, started buying some of Pomerol’s best estates and exporting the wines. Today the influential Moueix family owns Pomerol’s most famous estate, Château Pétrus, along with numerous other Pomerol estates. Pomerol wines, primarily Merlot blended with small amounts of Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon, are considered softer and less tannic than left bank Bordeaux.

TYPE

Red Wine, Merlot

The Merlot grape is such a deep blue that it is named for the blackbird. It’s an early ripening grape and one of the primary varietals used In Bordeaux. Merlot is also grown in the "International style," which is harvested later to bring out more tannins and body.

VINTAGE