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2001 Hospices de Beaune Mazis Chambertin Cuvee Madeleine Collignon Henri Boillot

ITEM 8071471 - Removed from a temperature and humidity controlled wine cellar

Bidder Amount Total
yoyo_d_PR $225 $225
$225
Item Sold Amount Date
I8227488 2 $225 May 15, 2022
I8175205 1 $225 Apr 10, 2022
I8120102 1 $225 Feb 20, 2022
I8071471 1 $225 Jan 23, 2022
I8036444 1 $235 Dec 19, 2021
Front Item Photo

RATINGS

92-95Burghound.com

...big, robust, concentrated flavors that simply ooze pinot extract. Despite the sheer size and weight, this remains remarkably well balanced and the gorgeous sap completely wraps and buffers the substantial tannic backbone.

PRODUCER

Hospices de Beaune

Every November the annual Hospices de Beaune Wine Auction takes place in the heart of Burgundy. The auction is one of the wine world’s most prestigious and historic events. For 157 years the auction – which is a charitable event benefitting a hospital built in the 15th century -- has served as a bellwether for growers, negociants and collectors to gauge the quality of new vintage. The fine Burgundies offered to the participants in the Hospices de Beaune auction are made in very limited quantities, and they represent the best of traditional Burgundian winemaking.

REGION

France, Burgundy, Côte d'Or, Côte de Nuits, Gevrey-Chambertin, Mazis-Chambertin

Mazis-Chambertin is a 22.4 acre Grand Cru vineyard near the village of Gevrey-Chambertin. The name Mazis is sometimes spelled with a “y” or without the final “s.” The soil is shallow and somewhat rocky, and the wine made from this vineyard is considered excellent. The legendary Lalou Bize of Maison Leroy is one of the smaller landholders with about .6 of an acre. There are some 30 proprietors with parcels in Mazis-Chambertin. The largest are Hospices de Beaune, with 4.38 acres; Bernard Dugat-Py, with 3.05 acres; and Joseph Faiveley, with 3 acres.

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.