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2016 Elvio Cogno Barbaresco Bordini

Light label condition issue

ITEM 8019343 - Removed from a professional wine storage facility; Purchased upon release

Bidder Amount Total
$45
Item Sold Amount Date
I8092992 1 $45 Jan 23, 2022
I8066500 3 $45 Jan 16, 2022
I8059148 3 $45 Jan 9, 2022
I8050395 4 $45 Jan 2, 2022
I8043995 2 $45 Dec 26, 2021
I8044006 1 $45 Dec 26, 2021
I8025964 3 $45 Dec 12, 2021
I8019323 2 $45 Dec 5, 2021
I8012265 1 $45 Nov 28, 2021
I8003027 4 $45 Nov 21, 2021
Front Item Photo

RATINGS

95Wine Enthusiast

Camphor, dark spice, wild herbs and woodland berry aromas shape the nose. On the focused palate, bright acidity and taut, refined tannins accompany crushed raspberry, juicy Marasca cherry and star anise. Mint and orange zest notes give depth to the finish.

94Wine Spectator

Rose, cherry and licorice aromas and flavors are accented by leather, tobacco and spice...

94James Suckling

A ripe but balanced and very impressive...intense strawberry essence, leather, dried red plums and pretty, lifted orange rind. Beautifully mouth-filling and complex in the palate, drawing together strands of ripe tannin and flavorful fruit. Powerful on the robust but well articulated finish.

92The Wine Advocate

...showing some carefully evolved notes and a subdued style. The wine feels well contoured and shaped with softened layers of bramble and wild berry. There is bright elegance and grace here.

92Vinous / IWC

...classy, polished wine... Sweet spice, tobacco, menthol, licorice and cloves add lovely shades of nuance. Dark in its expression...very nicely done.

PRODUCER

Elvio Cogno

Elvio Cogno is a 33-acre estate in the Langhe. The Cogno family history in the area dates back several centuries during which the Cognos always cultivated grapevines. By the mid-20 century the family was also running a beloved restaurant in La Morra and using their own grapes to make wine to serve at the restaurant. The wine was so popular that in the late 1950s Elvio Cogno left the restaurant business to make wine full time. He collaborated with La Marcarini winery in La Morra, and his debut commercial release was a 1961 Barolo. He went on to become one of the region’s most admired winemakers. In 1990 Cogno purchased an 18th century farmhouse and surrounding vineyards, updating both. Today the estate is run by Elvio’s daughter Nadia Cogno and her husband Valter Fissore. The estate produces Barolos and other Langhe wines that are highly praised by wine writers, including the influential Italian journal Gambero Rosso, which notes that “each wine (made at the estate) is better than the last.” Robert M. Parker Jr. has written that the estate’s wines “are consistently excellent to outstanding.” Cogno produces 80,000 bottles annually.

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barbaresco

Barbaresco is one of the two most acclaimed DOCGs in Piedmont, the other being Barolo. Located just a few miles north of Barolo, Barbaresco is a small town of fewer than 700 people and 1,680 vineyard acres, making it less than half the size of the Barolo DOCG. The other communes in this DOCG of rolling hills are Neive and Treiso. As in Barolo, the DOCG requires that Barbaresco DOCG wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. By the late 20th century respected producers were making outstanding Nebbiolos, as well as Nebbiolo blends that do not carry the DOCG label. Barbaresco was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to a DCOG in 1980. DOCG Barbaresco must be aged a minimum of two years, with a minimum of one year in wood. Barbarescos are regarded as more subtle and refined than Barolos, and more approachable when young.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.