Sign In

2016 Vietti Barolo Castiglione

ITEM 7975703 - Removed from a temperature and humidity controlled wine storage unit

Bidder Quantity Amount Total
wigos 1 $51 $51
sulee 1 $51 $51
speycast… 0 of 2 $50 $0
2 $50
Item Sold Amount Date
I7975703 2 $51 Oct 17, 2021
I7969815 1 $50 Oct 10, 2021
Front Item Photo

RATINGS

95Jeb Dunnuck

...ripe, sexy style yet has a wonderful elegance as well as medium to full body, ripe, integrated tannins, and layered notes of black raspberries, cherries, spring flowers, orange blossom, and violets. It's not massive, but it’s beautifully complex, with plenty of richness and depth on the mid-palate, and shows the sunny, sexy style of the vintage, followed by a great finish...

94+ The Wine Advocate

...opens to a grounded and authentic profile with hints of mint, balsam herb and tilled earth. The primary fruit is neatly folded into all those other components, and all received equal billing when the final results are counted... ...vintage shows a heightened level of intensity, complexity and freshness. Those silky tannins are followed by beautiful menthol brightness. This is a real charmer.

94Vinous / IWC

...dazzling wine... ...Rich, ample and explosive, the 2016 possesses tremendous richness and resonance from the very first taste. Bright red cherry and red plum fruit, wild flowers, mint, blood orange and spice build as this sumptuous, dramatic Barolo shows all it's got...

94James Suckling

Plenty of perfume here with abundant roses and violets, as well as spice-dusted red cherries and hints of orange rind. The palate has depth and density with a sense of power and detail to the tannins. Long, dense and fresh.

PRODUCER

Vietti

Vietti traces its roots to the 19th century. It gets its name from Mario Vietti, who started bottling his wines on the estate in 1919, putting his name on the bottles. Vietti was sold in 2016 to Krause Holdings, an Iowa-based, family-owned corporation that owns convenience stores, transportation and real estate businesses. Luca Currado of the Vietti family will remain on as CEO of the 84-acre estate. Vietti has long been known as an estate that successfully mixes tradition with modern wine making. Gambero Rosso, Italy’s leading wine journal, notes that the estate is “brilliantly managed” and the family brings out the best from “the marvelous vineyards.” Vietti offers numerous wines, from Barolo and Barbaresco to Barbera d’Alba and Moscato. The signature Barolos typically earn very high ratings and wide acclaim. Robert M. Parker Jr. noted that the 2007 Vietti Barolo Brunate is “a stunner…that captures the essence of one of Piedmont’s greatest sites.”

REGION

Italy, Piedmont, Barolo

Barolo is one of Italy’s greatest wine appellations. In fact many cognoscenti of Italian wines consider Barolo to be the apex of Italian winemaking. Barolo is sometimes referred to as “the king of wines, and the wine of kings” partly because until the mid-19th century Piedmont was owned by the noble House of Savoy, the historic rulers of northwestern Italy. And the Savoys had a taste for Nebbiolo. Nestled into the rolling hills of Langhe, the Barolo DOCG includes 11 communes, one of which is the town of Barolo. There are 4,200 vineyard acres in the appellation and since the late 19th century growers have tried to identify their best vineyards. By marketing some vineyards as better quality than others, Barolo producers have followed the Burgundian custom of making single vineyard, or “cru” vineyard bottlings. As in neighboring Barbaresco, the Barolo DOCG requires that wines be 100% Nebbiolo, a grape thought of as the Pinot Noir of Italy. Records show that Nebbiolo was grown in the Piedmont as early as the 14th century, and despite being somewhat finicky – it is late to ripen and easily damaged by adverse weather --- Nebbiolo makes highly aromatic and powerful red wines. Until the mid-19th century Nebbiolos of Piedmont were vinified as sweet wines, though that ended in the late 19th century when a French oenologist was invited to Piedmont to show producers how to make dry reds. Barolo was made a DOC in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980. Barolos must be aged at least three years, at least two of those years in wood. Barolos are tannic and robust and generally need at least five years to soften into complex, earthy wines.

TYPE

Red Wine, Nebbiolo, D.O.C.G.

This red grape is most often associated with Piedmont, where it becomes DOCG Barolo and Barbaresco, among others. Its name comes from Italian for “fog,” which descends over the region at harvest. The fruit also gains a foggy white veil when mature.