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1991 Louis Jadot Chambertin Clos de Beze

ITEM 7951024 - Removed from a temperature and humidity controlled wine cellar; Purchased at retail

Bidder Quantity Amount Total
malbex 1 $265 $265
yoyo_d_PR 1 of 2 $265 $265
anjon5 0 of 1 $255 $0
dagon 0 of 1 $245 $0
2 $245
Front Item Photo

RATINGS

91Wine Spectator

Brilliantly focused, with currant, violet and raspberry flavors packed into a lean and elegant frame, finishing long and seductive.

PRODUCER

Louis Jadot

Maison Louis Jadot is one of Burgundy’s most respected negociants. Founded in 1859 by the Jadot family, the prestige and quality of the estate’s wines were well established in the 19th century. The family continued buying highly desirable vineyards in the 20th century. In 1985 the estate was sold to Rudy Kopf, Jadot’s American importer. Located in Beaune, the estate has 336 acres of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Gamay. Though all the maison’s wines are known for their high quality, signature wines are the Bonnes Mares, Chambertin-Close de Beze, Chevalier-Montrachet les Demoiselles, Corton-Charlemagne, Le Montrachet and Musigny. Pierre-Henry Gagey is president.

REGION

France, Burgundy, Côte d'Or, Côte de Nuits, Gevrey-Chambertin, Chambertin Clos-de-Beze

Chambertin Clos-de-Beze is a Grand Cru vineyard in Gevrey-Chambertin, and its history goes back to the 7th century when it was owned by the monks of the Abbey of Beze. After the French Revolution the Catholic Church was forced to divide the vineyard among peasants. Today it is a 38-acre vineyard, making it slightly larger than Chambertin. Chambertin and Chambertin Clos-de-Beze are adjacent and share similar limestone, clay and gravel soils. Of the 18 proprietors, the largest by acreage are Pierre Damoy, 13.4 acres; Armand Rousseau, 3.5 acres; and Drouhin-Laroze, 3.48 acres.

TYPE

Red Wine, Pinot Noir, Grand Cru

This red wine is relatively light and can pair with a wide variety of foods. The grape prefers cooler climates and the wine is most often associated with Burgundy, Champagne and the U.S. west coast. Regional differences make it nearly as fickle as it is flexible.